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Page 1 of 11, showing 10 records out of 103 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Nancy Landon Kassebaum

United States Senate

A photograph of Nancy Landon Kassebaum, United States Senator from Kansas, placing an ornament on a Christmas tree.

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Alfred Larzelere

Alfred Larzelere of Doniphan County was active in free state politics. He served as speaker of the Kansas House in 1859 and as a delegate to the Leavenworth constitutional convention. He was also a member of the Free State Central committee.

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Kansas Day 94

This card issued by Bill and Linda Graves invites fellow Kansans to join them for a "Kansas Celebration" to reflect on the solid beliefs, actions and understandings that makes the state rich in tradition on its 133rd anniversary of statehood.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania of his journey to Kansas City to obtain a land warrant for Topeka and to attend the Free State Convention. Two of his articles had been published in The Herald of Freedom, a Lawrence newspaper, and he sent copies. Mentioning political difficulties, Holliday suggested that his wife wait until fall to travel to Kansas. He rented out his cabin in Topeka for profit. A deadly cholera epidemic at Fort Riley had ended.

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Walter Augustus Huxman

This black and white photograph shows Governor Walter Huxman during his inaugural parade along Sixth & Kansas in Topeka, Kansas. Huxman, a Democrat, was elected on November 3, 1936, as the twenty-seventh governor of Kansas, from 1937 to 1930. Failing to be reelected in 1939, Huxman was nominated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth District. He held this position until stepping down in 1962.

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John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

On the first day of the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, Ingalls wrote from Wyandotte, Kansas, with observation on the city and the nature of the convention, which he considered "not a very superior one." Nevertheless, the Republicans had a big majority, and Ingalls was "on some of the most important committees in the convention and shall be obliged to do some hard work."

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Mary Brown to William Brown

Brown, Mary Ann Day , 1816-1884

This letter, written by Mary Brown from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, was addressed to her brother, William, who was studying at Phillip Exeter Academy in New Hampshire. Mary and William were the children of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. The main focus of the letter is the story of how Dr. John Doy was captured by Missourians while aiding twelve fugitive slaves. Mary was convinced that someone had told the Missourians about the plan of escape. She also mentioned her father's religious work, and "Old" John Brown's work to free Missouri slaves.

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Settlers on Little Sugar Creek

Stewart, John E.

This listing of the settlers along Little Sugar Creek includes information about each settler, the resources in the area, and local buildings. It also includes an account of an attack by the Missouri ruffians in which a number of men were carried off to Westport, Missouri. It was most likely compiled by John E. Stewart at the request of Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee.

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Isaac Tichenor Goodnow to Quereau

Goodnow, Isaac T. (Isaac Tichenor), 1814-1894

Isaac Goodnow wrote from Kansas Territory to a friend Quereau of New England. It appeared that Goodnow was growing tired of the hard -scrabble life in the Territory, which was "decidedly injurious" to his constitution. He also showed signs of discouragement regarding the founding of a college in K.T., resigned to the idea that "for the time to come little can be done educationally." Goodnow told Quereau that he was actively seeking a teaching job back in the States.

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William Hutchinson to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Hutchinson, William , 1823-1904

William B. Hutchinson, an abolitionist from Lawrence, Kansas Territory and secretary of the Freemen of Kansas, wrote to Cyrus K. Holliday, free state activist and president of the Topeka Town Association, informing him of his appointment to a secret committee. The fifty-two members were to gather and turn in evidence against those responsible for election fraud. Holliday had also been appointed to the fund-raising subcommittee. In a later written response, Holliday refused these appointments, referring to time-consuming family and business responsibilities.

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