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Government and Politics -- Territorial Government (Remove)
People -- Men (Remove)
Date -- 1854-1860 (Remove)
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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 18 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Jonathan Crews to Thomas Nesbit Stinson

Crews, Jonathan

Jonathan Crews, writing from LaPorte, Indiana, expressed strong proslavery views on the situation in Kansas. Crews described his trip home to Indiana from Kansas and discussed several Indiana court cases involving his business interests.

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List of voters of 7th senatorial district

Barry, Abraham

A list of the voters in Kansas Territory's 7th senatorial district, which included Manhattan and the area surrounding it. Voters were categorized as free soilers, proslavery, and doubtful. The census was taken by order of the "Central Committee" (a free state group) and was signed by Abraham Barry, Isaac T. Goodnow, and J. D. Adams of District Committee No. 7.

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Territorial Census, 1855, District 6

Barbee, William

This census was taken in order to determine eligible voters for elections to be held as proclaimed by Governor Andrew Reeder on November 10, 1854. The categories for information in the census were name, occupation, age, gender, emigrated from, native of United States, naturalized citizen, declarant (intention to become a citizen), Negro, slave, and voter. Only white males over twenty-one were eligible to vote. The districts used for the census were the same as the election districts. There was a summary of voters in the 6th district at the end of the enumeration. For District Six, the place of election was the house of H. T. Wilson, at Fort Scott. The boundaries of each district were described in Governor Reeder's proclamation, and it is difficult to determine what counties were in each district. The description of the Sixth District follows: "Commencing on the Missouri State line, in Little Osage River; thence up the same to the line of the reserve of the New York Indians, or to the nearest point thereto; thence to and by the north line of said reserve to the Neosho River, and up said southern line of the Territory; thence by the southern and eastern lines of said Territory to the place of beginning."

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Kansas Territory citizens to the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America

This unsigned statement was written to protest "the practice of taxing the people of the Territories for the support of a Government in which they are not represented." The residents of Kansas Territory complained that they had had no voice in how these tax dollars were appropriated, and they asked this "honorable body" to remit to them these taxes. Since this was during the drought of 1860, they declared that they would use these funds for famine relief.

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Territorial Census, 1855, District 5

Barbee, William

This census was taken in order to determine eligible voters for elections to be held as proclaimed by Governor Andrew Reeder on November 10, 1854. The categories for information in the census were name, occupation, age, gender, emigrated from, native of United States, naturalized citizen, declarant (intention to become a citizen), Negro, slave, and voter. Only white males over twenty-one were eligible to vote. The districts used for the census were the same as the election districts. There was an index and summary at the end of the census enumeration. For District 5, the place of election was the house of Hy. Sherman, on the old John Jones improvement, on Pottawatomie Creek. The boundaries of each district were described in Governor Reeder's proclamation, and it is difficult to determine what counties were in each district. The description of the Fifth District follows: "Commencing at the Missouri State line, at the southern boundary of the Fourth District; thence east along the same to the northwest corner of the Sac and Fox Reservation; thence due south along the western line thereof and due south to the south branch of the Neosho River, about seventy miles above the Catholic Osage Mission; thence down the said river to the north line of the reserve for New York Indians, and east along said line to the head waters of Little Osage River, or the nearest point thereto; and thence down said river to the Missouri State line, and up said line to the place of beginning."

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Poll Book, Atchison, Lecompton Constitution

Adams, F. G. (Franklin George), 1824-1899

On January 4, 1858, by act of the free-state territorial legislature, the Kansas Territory voters were given a second chance to vote on the Lecompton Constitution. This poll book identifies the 319 individuals who voted against the Constitution as framed at Lecompton. The authenticity of the document was attested to by election judges, including F.G. Adams, and two clerks.

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John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

Much of this interesting letter, dated November 21, 1858, from Sumner, Kansas Territory, describes the Ingalls law practice and the nature of a "frontier" court proceedings that often attracted "nearly all the population." According to Ingalls, "the chief difficulty arising [in the courts came] from the conflict of the two Codes, adopted by two hostile legislatures, each of which had adherents who call the other 'bogus.'" Ingalls also discussed the business of land sales, as something many others successfully combined with the practice of law.

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Samuel Lyle Adair to John Brown

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Samuel Adair wrote his brother-in-law John Brown from Osawatomie on October 2, 1857, to explain why he could not come see Brown in Iowa. Much of letter describes the general poor state of health in his locale, but he also comments on the political and especially the prospects for free state success in the upcoming election--Adair was not optimistic.

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Territorial Census, 1855, District 1

Babcock, Carmi W., 1830-1889

This census was taken in order to determine eligible voters for elections to be held as proclaimed by Governor Andrew Reeder on November 10, 1854. The categories for information in the census were name, occupation, age, male, female, emigrated from, native of United States, naturalized citizen, declarant (intention to become a citizen), Negro, slave, and voter. Only white males over 21 were eligible to vote. The districts used for the census were the same as the election districts. A statistical summary of the census follows the enumeration pages. For District 1, the place of election was the office of Dr. Charles Robinson in Lawrence. The boundaries of each district were described in Governor Reeder's proclamation and it is difficult to determine what counties were in each district. The description of the First District follows: "Commencing at the Missouri State line, on the south bank of the Kansas River; thence along the south bank of said river to the first tributary or watered ravine running into the Kansas above the town of Lawrence, thence up that tributary to the head thereof; thence in a direct line to the west side of __Rolf's house; thence, by a due south line, to the Santa Fe Road; thence by the middle of said road to the Missouri State line; and thence by said State line to the place of beginning."

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S. L. Adair to the friends of Christ

Adair, Samuel Lyle

This letter reported on the current religious situation in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. According to the author, a missionary with the American Missionary Association, the residents had begun the preliminary steps for organizing a church. In Osawatomie there were a number of Baptists, Congregationalists, and Wesleyans, along with a large group who "make no profession of religion." Adair also wrote about the sickness that prevented more formal organization.

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