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Community Life -- Clubs and organizations -- Charitable -- Relief (Remove)
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Page 1 of 1, showing 8 records out of 8 total, starting on record 1, ending on 8

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

National Kansas Relief Committee, minutes

National Kansas Committee

This document details the minutes of three meetings of the Kansas Relief Committee, otherwise known as the National Kansas Committee, held in 1856 on June 9th, June 21st, and June 26th. It also includes information about the membership of this emigrant aid company. The first of these meetings adopted resolutions to aid the plight of free-state settlers in Kansas Territory. Furthermore, the members of the committee decided to establish five thousand settlers in Kansas Territory and to give them a year's worth of provisions.

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Testimony of Lemuel Knapp

National Kansas Committee

This testimony, recorded by the National Kansas Committee, describes the Kansas experience of Lemuel Knapp, a settler who emigrated to the area near Fort Riley, Kansas Territory. His statement includes personal information as well as comments on the development of Pawnee City and the role that it played in the early years of Kansas Territory. It also relates an account of how the President ordered the destruction of Pawnee City because the newly drawn boundaries placed it on the Fort Riley Military Reserve.

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George W. Hunt and C. Stearns to Blood, Hutchinson, et. al.

Hunt, George W.

On behalf of a committee of Lawrence citizens, Hunt and Stearns write the State Central Committee of Kansas "to urge upon your attention several important points in reference to the present condition of Kansas." They were convinced that a "storm" from Missouri was about "to burst upon the devoted heads of the freemen of Kansas" and "perhaps to deluge Kansas with rivers of blood." The committee urges the state and national organizations to help them prepare for the storm, while things were relatively calm, with an adequate supply of arms and ammunition and men. They call only for "moral heroes" who would not follow the "principles of Border Ruffianism."

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R. S. Griffithe, N. W. Spicer, and J. A. Harvey testimonies

These testimonies, collected by the National Kansas Committee, record the experiences of three settlers during the turbulent times of Bleeding Kansas. The testimonies focus on each settler's involvement in free-state activities, and their interaction with Missouri border ruffians. Griffithe and Spicer both served in the free-state militia, and Harvey, who had commanded an emigrant train from Chicago, was the commander of a free-state company.

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James M. Winchell to Thaddeus Hyatt

Winchell, James M

James M. Winchell wrote from Burlington to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, regarding an emigrant train of 500 settlers heading south from Iowa City. The author intended to travel to speak with Governor Geary before he met up with the emigrants. Winchell also included in this letter a private insert pertaining to the unscrupulous dealings of a Kansas politician named Dr. Root.

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William Frederick Milton Arny to Thaddeus Hyatt

Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881

W. F. M. Arny, an agent of the National Kansas Committee, wrote this letter to Thaddeus Hyatt while traveling on the Missouri River. The main focus of this letter revolved around committee business and the state of affairs in Kansas. During this visit to Kansas, Arny had reorganized the Kansas Central Committee in order to increase its efficiency, and he included in this letter a revised list of its officers and members. He also wrote about his conversation with Governor Geary concerning the various volunteer companies created by free state men. The letter ends with a brief description of the suffering of the settlers, their meager diet, and their desperate need for more provisions.

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James H. Greene to John Brown

Greene, James H.

James Greene, who had spent two years in Kansas himself, wrote from his Jefferson (hometown of Senator Benjamin F. Wade), Ashtabula Co., Ohio, newspaper office (Ashtabula Sentinel) to inform his friend that he would be publishing Brown's circular "soliciting aid for Kansas" and to ask what Brown's future plans were. The news from the territory was not good, according to Greene, and he wondered if there would be war or peace. Greene was still hopeful that the "free state men will eventually triumph," but most of his neighbors believed Kansas "will be a Slave State."

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Thomas J. Marsh to George Luther Stearns

Marsh, Thomas J.

Upon his return to the East (Boston), Marsh wrote to Stearns on December 18, 1857, to provide a relatively brief outline of his experience and accomplishments since leaving for Kansas Territory on committee business the previous June. He said others could be the judge of the success of the "mission," but "a Free State Legislature was secured by the election" and Governor Charles Robinson had been "quite complimentary" of Marsh in a letter to Amos A. Lawrence.

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