Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Government and Politics -- Crime and Punishment (Remove)
Places (Remove)
Community Life -- Religion (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Type of Material (Remove)
People (Remove)
Page 1 of 1, showing 3 records out of 3 total, starting on record 1, ending on 3

<< previous| | next >>

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Settlers on Little Sugar Creek

Stewart, John E.

This listing of the settlers along Little Sugar Creek includes information about each settler, the resources in the area, and local buildings. It also includes an account of an attack by the Missouri ruffians in which a number of men were carried off to Westport, Missouri. It was most likely compiled by John E. Stewart at the request of Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee.

previewthumb

James Griffing to J. Augusta Goodrich

Griffing, James S. (James Sayre), 1822-1882

James Griffing wrote from the steamboat New Lucy on the Missouri River to his fiancee, J. Augusta Goodrich, in Owego, New York. Griffing, a Methodist minister, was on his way back to New York to get married. He commented upon the concerns that Ms. Goodrich likely was experiencing as she prepared to leave her New York home to join him in Kansas Territory. Griffing tried to convince Ms. Goodrich that they would make a good home for themselves in Kansas. He also expressed the opinion that the "excitement upon the slavery question" in Kansas Territory was exaggerated, and that serious violence over the issue was unlikely.

previewthumb

John S. Brown to William Brown

Brown, John S.

This letter, written from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, by John Stillman Brown, was addressed to his son, William Brown, who was studying at Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire. The letter included information about their local church meetings and the talk surrounding the murder of Gaius Jenkins by James Henry Lane over a land dispute. Brown also mentioned a sermon he'd preached, which outlined the beliefs of the Unitarians. He admonished his son to immerse himself in the Scriptures, and to stop drinking tea and other stimulants. The letter concluded with a discussion of politics, particularly the Lecompton and Leavenworth Constitutions.

previewthumb
<< previous| | next >>