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Page 1 of 4, showing 10 records out of 39 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

A.S. Wilson to Henry J. Allen

Kansas. Governor (1919-1923 : Allen)

A.S. Wilson, an attorney in Galena, Kansas, writes to Governor Henry J. Allen to indicate his interest in a law that would allow second class cities to separate the schools based on "white and colored children." He included a petition with signatures with the letter.

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Jonathan Crews to Thomas Nesbit Stinson

Crews, Jonathan

Jonathan Crews, writing from LaPorte, Indiana, expressed strong proslavery views on the situation in Kansas. Crews described his trip home to Indiana from Kansas and discussed several Indiana court cases involving his business interests.

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Temperance history correspondence

Correspondence sent and received by Rev. Robert Norris, secretary of the Kansas State Temperance Union, and Julian K. Codding, attorney for the Kansas State Temperance Union. Correspondents include Elizabeth P. Hutchinson and Minnie Wood, presidents of the Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Rev. J. M. Dunlavy, president of the Crawford County Civil League and Third Congressional District of the KSTU, Rev. J. W. Primrose, superintendent of the Second Congressional District of the KSTU in Fort Scott, John Wiswell, chairman of the Cherokee County Law Enforcement Aid Committee, and representatives from the Anti-Saloon League of America. Much of the correspondence concerns efforts to advance anti-liquor agendas in local, state, and national politics. Although Kansas was the first state to adopt a constitutional amendment prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors in 1880, the law was largely unenforced.

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Temperance history correspondence

Correspondence sent and received by the Kansas State Temperance Union (KSTU). Rev. Robert Norris acted as secretary, John Marshall, attorney, and Julian K. Codding, attorney and later president of the Kansas State Temperance Union. Correspondents include Elizabeth P. Hutchinson, president of the Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Rev. J.M. Dunlavy, superintendent of the Third Congressional District of the KSTU, Rev. J.W. Primrose, superintendent of the Second Congressional District of the KSTU, Mary Evelyn Dobbs, president of the Third District of the Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union, the Kansas State Prohibition Committee, and representatives from the Anti-Saloon League of America. Much of the correspondence concerns efforts to advance anti-liquor agendas in local, state, and national politics. Although Kansas was the first state to adopt a constitutional amendment prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors in 1880, the law was largely unenforced.

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Temperance history correspondence

This correspondence was sent and received by Frank M. Stahl, superintendent of the Kansas State Temperance Union. A letter from James K. Shields, state superintendent for the Anti-Saloon League of Illinois, asks for Stahl's assistance in recruiting Governor Walter R. Stubbs for a temperance rally in Springfield, Illinois, in opposition to the "United Societies boozers of Chicago." A letter from J. F. Baker, legislative superintendent for the Wisconsin Anti-Saloon League seeks information about prohibitory zones around Kansas universities as the state of Wisconsin attempts to exclude saloons from the college town of Madison. Correspondence with W. H. Edmundson and E. D. Mikesell, attorneys in Fredonia, regards the selling and prosecution of "Belgian Beer" which supposedly contained one-half of one percent of alcohol and was sold by children at lemonade stands. Stahl responded that "the internal revenue collectors have rather overstepped their duties." Although Kansas was the first state to adopt a constitutional amendment prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors in 1880, the law was largely unenforced.

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Temperance history correspondence

Correspondence relating to the Kansas State Temperance Union and its activities promoting the enforcement of prohibition in the state of Kansas. Frank M. Stahl served as superintendent and John Marshall served as attorney. They wrote a number of the letters contained in this collection. Leaders of the temperance movement frequently corresponded with county attorneys, civic leaders, ministers, and pastors. Included are several letters supporting James A. Lyons of Langdon, Kansas, who was charged with selling intoxicating liquors, and a circular announcing the guilty verdict in the case of Assistant Attorney General C. W. Trickett of Wyandotte County, Kansas, who accepted illegal fees in the prosecution of liquor cases. The collection contains correspondence from numerous Kansas communities.

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William F.Rightmire

This is a portrait of William F. Rightmire, an attorney, who came to Kansas in 1887, and practiced law in Larned, Cottonwood Falls, and Topeka. In 1888, he was nominated by the Union-Labor Party of Kansas as its attorney general candidate. Two years later in 1890, Rightmire was nominated as the People's Party candidate for Chief Justice of the Kansas Supreme Court.

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Knox & Kellogg to James B. Abbott

Attorneys Knox & Kellogg wrote from St. Louis to James Abbott in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, responding to a lawsuit brought against them by Samuel Cabot. Cabot held them responsible for the long delay in returning several rifles that had been stolen from him the previous spring by Missouri "Highwaymen." Knox and Kellogg reported to Abbott, acting as agent for Cabot, that the lawsuit had been dismissed and the damage to the rifles was to be appraised by a third party.

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Elisha J. Scott

Elisha J. Scott, 1890-1963, was raised in Topeka's Tennesseetown. As a youth, he possessed a strong drive and a quick wit, which attracted the eye of prominent Topeka minister Charles M. Sheldon. With financial support from Sheldon and his own abilities to succeed, Scott earned his law degree from Washburn College in 1916. During his long career as an attorney, he argued many civil rights and school segregation cases throughout Kansas and the Midwest. Two of Scott's sons, John and Charles, joined him in his law firm of Scott, Scott, Scott, and Jackson. Together they helped to prosecute, at the local level, the landmark civil rights case of Brown v. Topeka Board of Education.

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Salmon P. Chase

Salmon P. Chase was the Governor of Ohio from 1855 to 1860. As an attorney, he defended fugitive slaves and was active in the antislavery and free soil movements. He later served as Secretary of the Treasury under Abraham Lincoln. This image was taken later in his life.

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