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Government and Politics -- Reform and Protest (Remove)
Date -- 1854-1860 (Remove)
Type of Material -- Photographs (Remove)
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Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 19 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Alfred Larzelere

Alfred Larzelere of Doniphan County was active in free state politics. He served as speaker of the Kansas House in 1859 and as a delegate to the Leavenworth constitutional convention. He was also a member of the Free State Central committee.

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Henry Miles Moore

A mounted sixth plate tintype portrait of Henry Miles Moore. He was a member of the Leavenworth Town Company, a representative to the Free-State Conventions at Topeka and Grasshopper Falls, 1857, and a member of the 1857 Territorial Legislature. At the Democratic Convention held in Atchison, March, 1860, Moore was appointed a delegate to the Charleston National Convention.

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Henry Ward Beecher

Mora, J. M.

Portrait of Henry Ward Beecher,1813-1887. Beecher was a prominent, theologically liberal American Congregationalist clergyman and social reformer, and famous speaker who was born in Litchfield, Connecticut, the son of famous evangelist Lyman Beecher and brother to Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of Uncle Tom's Cabin. Another well-known sister was Isabella Beecher Hooker, a suffragist. He also had a brother, Charles Beecher, who was a renowned Congregationalist minister. Henry Ward Beecher and his congregation in the East contributed Sharp's carbines and Bibles to the Beecher Bible Rifle Colony in Wabaunsee, Kan.

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William Hutchinson

Clinedinst

A portrait of William Hutchinson, a journalist and correspondent for the New York Times, Chicago Tribune, St. Louis Democrat and Washington Republic, he covered events in Kansas from 1855 through the early 1860s. He settled in Lawrence, Kansas Territory. Hutchinson served as secretary of the Kansas Central Committee and assisted with efforts to send emigrant parties and relief to Kansas Territory. He was first identified with the abolition or free-soil party, until the Republican party organized. Hutchinson was a member of the Wyandotte Constitution Convention and was an early and persistent advocate of temperance and other reforms.

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Samuel Clarke Pomeroy

A portrait of Samuel Clarke Pomeroy, businessman and politician. In 1859, he attended the Convention at Osawatomie and the Republican Convention at Lawrence. Pomeroy was elected president of the Kansas Relief Committee in November, 1860. After statehood, he served as United States Senator from April 4, 1861 to March 3, 1873.

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Rev. Lewis Bodwell

Smith, C.T. ; Topeka, KS

View of Rev. Lewis Bodwell, first pastor of the First Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas.

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Charles Sumner

Portrait of Charles Sumner, U. S. Senator from Massachusetts. He delivered the speech that later became known by the title "The Crime Against Kansas".

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John James Ingalls

A uncased sixth plate ambrotype portrait of John James Ingalls. He came to the Kansas Territory in the late 1850s. Ingalls, a lawyer and politician, represented Atchison County at the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July, 1859. In January, 1860 and 1861, he was an officer of the council when the legislature met at Lecompton. At the Republican Convention at Lawrence, April, 1860, Ingalls was elected to represent the Kansas Territory at the Chicago National Convention. He later served in the Kansas and the United States Senate.

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William H. Russell

A formal portrait of William H. Russell, who was a proslavery supporter and businessman. In the winter of 1858-1859, Russell, with Alexander Majors, William Waddell, and John Jones, founded the Leavenworth and Pike's Peak Express Company, a freight and stage company that operated between Leavenworth and Denver, Colorado. In February, 1860, it was reorganized as the Central Overland California & Pike's Peak Express Company. In 1860, Russell, with partners Majors and Waddell, created the first Pony Express, which connected St. Joseph, Missouri, across 2,000 miles to the state of California.

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John Doy and rescue party

DaLee, Amon Gilbert

On January 25, 1859, free state activists Dr. John Doy and his son, Charles, left Lawrence, Kansas Territory, for Nebraska with 13 slaves. They were captured when only twelve miles out of Lawrence, and were taken to Weston, Missouri. The two Doys had an examination at Weston and were committed to jail at Platte City, Missouri, for the crime of abducting slaves. They remained in jail until March 20, 1859, then moved to St. Joseph, Missouri, where Dr. Doy was tried. After the trial, Charles Doy was set free. However, the first jury could not agree on a verdict for Dr. Doy, and he was tried a second time. At the second trial, he was convicted and sentenced to five years in the penitentiary. While being held in the St. Joseph jail, he was freed by friends from Kansas Territory on July 23, 1859. People in the ambrotype are: (l to r) Major James B. Abbott, Captain Joshua A. Pike, Jacob Senix, Joseph Gardner, Thomas Simmons, S. J. Willis, Captain John E. Stuart [Stewart], Charles Doy, Silas Soule, George R. Hay, and Dr. John Doy (seated in front). The ambrotype was taken at Lawrence, Kansas Territory, in the summer of 1859.

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