Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Government and Politics -- Reform and Protest (Remove)
Thematic Time Period -- Industrialization and the National Economy, 1870 - 1920 (Remove)
Places (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Type of Material (Remove)
Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 15 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

<< previous| 1 | 2|

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

A.S. Wilson to Henry J. Allen

Kansas. Governor (1919-1923 : Allen)

A.S. Wilson, an attorney in Galena, Kansas, writes to Governor Henry J. Allen to indicate his interest in a law that would allow second class cities to separate the schools based on "white and colored children." He included a petition with signatures with the letter.

previewthumb

Between Millstones

Kelly, H. B.

This short pamphlet discusses the problems that high tariffs and the gold standard create for workers and farmers. It clearly presents Populist ideas about the dire situation of Kansas farmers by giving several examples of how businessmen and merchants benefit from the oppression of common laborers. The pamphlet was written by H. B. Kelly and printed by the Jeffersonian Publishing Company in Lawrence, Kansas; each pamphlet cost five cents.

previewthumb

The family album

Union Pacific Railway Company

A brochure reprinted by the Union Pacific Railroad including two magazine articles proposing that railroad insurance be adopted by the rail industry.

previewthumb

Kansas National Guardsman in the southeast Kansas coal fields

This photograph shows a Kansas National Guardsman in southeast Kansas during the coal strikes of 1919.

previewthumb

G. B. Woodford to Governor John Martin

Woodward, C.B.

In this letter, the local authorities of Labette County, Kansas, plead with Kansas governor John Martin for militia support to preserve order in Parsons during the railroad strike of 1886. In February 1885, railroad shop workers walked off the job because of a cut in pay and reduced hours of work. Governor Martin was able to negotiate a settlement to the strike but problems continued throughout Kansas, Missouri, and Texas.

previewthumb

A study of the present trades union system

Britton, Wiley

A booklet written by Wiley Britton that focuses on the trades union system. The author asks for equal rights, justice and moderation in the dealings of men with each other, and that special privileges should be given to no one.

previewthumb

Constitution of the Kansas State Federation of Labor

Kansas State Federation of Labor

This constitution of the Kansas State Federation of Labor, adopted on July 3, 1890 in Topeka, Kansas, declares the purpose and functions of the organization. The KSFL sought to organize the many labor organizations of Kansas into a federated union in support of general labor concerns. Its members advocated for an eight hour work day, better working conditions, and other industrial and social reforms of interest to all workers.

previewthumb

Notice! This is to warn you that the H.B. Howard Electrical Company hasn't a single licensed electrician in their employ

International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers

A notice to the public that the H.B. Howard Electrical Company does not employ any licensed electrician or one who can lawfully do electrical work in the city of Topeka without the constant supervision of an electrician. It also states that anyone finding a person doing the job by themselves to notify the members of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers or other proper authorities. This notice was signed by the Local Union 226 of the I.B.E.W., and committee members J.R. Woodhull, J.J. Carnahan, and J.W. Keele.

previewthumb

The coming issue

District Assembly Number 101

"The Coming Issue", volume 1 number 1, issued in Parsons, Kansas, by order of the District Assembly No. 101, arguing for eight hour work days for American workers.

previewthumb

Secretary to Governor Henry J. Allen to George W. Jacobs

Kansas. Governor (1919-1923 : Allen)

The secretary to Governor Henry J. Allen of Topeka, Kansas, writes to Philadelphia publisher George Jacobs acknowledging receipt of a letter regarding the newly created Kansas Court of Industrial Relations. In October 1919, Jacobs had written to U.S. President Woodrow Wilson suggesting the creation of a court system that would function much like the District and Federal Court system for the purpose of settling disputes between capital and labor.

previewthumb
<< previous| 1 | 2|