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Page 1 of 1, showing 9 records out of 9 total, starting on record 1, ending on 9

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Testimony of A. A. Harris, in report and testimony of the select committee to investigate the causes of the removal of the Negroes from the southern states to the northern states, in three parts

United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Negro Exodus

A. A. Harris, a white resident of Ft. Scott, Kansas, gave this brief testimony on March 29, 1880, before the Senate select committee investigating the causes of the Exodus. Harris described his contact with the black Exodusters in his area, including their difficulty finding employment. The committee also asked Harris to speak in some detail about the general treatment of African-Americans in Kansas, including any discrimination against them, particularly in the world of politics. This committee was composed of three Democratic senators and two Republican senators: Daniel W. Voorhees (Dem., Indiana), Zebulon B. Vance (Dem., North Carolina), George H. Pendleton (Dem., Ohio), William Windom (Rep., Minnesota), and Henry W. Blair (Rep., New Hampshire). Senators Blair and Vance asked the questions presented in this testimony.

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"The End, 1883"

Garretson, M.S.

This ink on paper drawing by Martin Garretson depicts the artist's conception of the changes in western Kansas as the open prairie was claimed for family farms. By 1883, the vast buffalo herds of the central plains had been hunted almost to the point of extinction. In the drawing, one man is shown loading bleached buffalo bones into an oxen-drawn wagon, while another man with a horse-drawn plow has begun plowing the cleared prairie for a farm crop. A young girl and boy are shown with piles of horns and horned skulls, and a woman is shown standing in the doorway of a small farmhouse in the background.

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Part 12: Exodusters, in first annual report of the Bureau of Labor and Industrial Statistics

Kansas Bureau of Labor

This excerpt of the Kansas Bureau of Labor report includes only Part 12, the portion of the report focusing on the Exodusters in Wyandotte, Kansas. The report includes transcribed testimonies of Exodusters as well as a detailed table showing statistics compiled from seventeen families, including their location, ages, health, and occupations. The report also includes a few references to Exodusters in Topeka.

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Bennett C. Riley

This photograph shows a portrait of Bennett Riley that was probably commissioned by his family in the 1880s. Riley died June 9, 1853. The portrait has resided at the U.S. Cavalry Museum at Fort Riley, Kansas, since about 1903. Bennett Riley, after whom Fort Riley was named, had a long and prestigious career in the U. S. military. Born in Virginia in 1787, he entered the army in 1813. In 1829 he commanded the first military escort on the Santa Fe Trail. In that same year, he succeeded Colonel Henry Leavenworth as commander of Fort Leavenworth. In 1847 he became a brigadier general. He also served during the Mexican War and, in 1848, he served as the last territorial governor of California, where he helped create their state constitution.

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1880 census of Farmer Township, Wabaunsee County, Kansas

United States. Census Office. 10th census, 1880

This excerpt of a census schedule provides details--including the name, age, race, and occupation--of settlers in Farmer Township in Wabaunsee County, Kansas. The county included a black population (B=Black) who had settled there in 1879 with the help of the Freedmen's Relief Association.

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1880 census of Rock Creek Township, Wabaunsee County, Kansas

United States. Census Office. 10th census, 1880

This excerpt of a census schedule provides details--including the name, age, race, and occupation--of settlers in Rock Creek Township in Wabaunsee County, Kansas. The county included a black population (B=Black) who had settled there in 1879 with the help of the Freedmen's Relief Association.

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1880 census of Nicodemus Township, Graham County, Kansas

United States. Census Office. 10th census, 1880

This census schedule provides details--including the name, age, race, and occupation--of both white and black settlers in Nicodemus Township in Graham County, Kansas. This township had been settled by Exodusters in 1877 along the south fork of the Solomon River. Today, the town of Nicodemus is the only surviving Exoduster settlement west of the Mississippi River.

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Family with their sod house, Decatur County, Kansas

This is a photograph of an unidentified family standing in front of their sod house near Norcatur, Decatur County, Kansas. Visible in the photograph is a windmill.

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He doesn't like female mayors

In this newspaper article, the former city marshal of Argonia, Sumner County, Kansas, laments the election of Susanna Salter as mayor, saying that "female mayors are no good." In particular, he was frustrated that she asked him to close his poker room, and she also prevented the local druggist (pharmacist) from keeping alcoholic beverages in stock. He claims that "Mrs. Salter has just killed Argonia." Originally published in the Indianapolis Journal, Indianapolis, Indiana, the article was republished in the Meade County Globe, Meade, Kansas, on January 28, 1888.

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