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Page 1 of 1, showing 5 records out of 5 total, starting on record 1, ending on 5

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Harry Walter Colmery as a young boy.

This is a portrait of Harry Walter Colmery, 1890-1979, Topeka attorney, American Legion National Commander, and author of the G. I. Bill of Rights. The photograph was taken when he was a young boy.

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Dwight David Eisenhower camping with a group of boys.

Dwight David Eisenhower is camping with a group of boys near Abilene, Kansas, in this photograph.

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Menninger family

Children of Dr. C. F. and Flo Menninger, (left to right) Karl (age 7), William (age 1), and Edwin (age 4). Karl and William obtained their medical degrees, completed psychiatric training, and helped their father establish the Menninger Clinic, in Topeka, Kansas, an internationally known psychiatric treatment and training facility. Edwin was a publisher.

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Elam Bartholomew residence, Rooks County, Kansas

This is an interior view of the Bartholomew's sod house. Elam and his wife Rachel are in the photograph. Elam Bartholomew settled in Rooks County, Kansas, in 1874. He was born in Pennsylvania and his family moved to Ohio and then Illinois. In 1873 he became engaged to Rachel Montgomery and in June 1877 traveled to Illinois for the wedding. They returned to Kansas in September of 1877. The Bartholomews lived on their farm on Bow Creek until 1929 when they moved to Hays. Elam Bartholomew was a well known botanist specializing in rust flora and he served as curator of the mycological museum at Fort Hays Kansas State College. He died in 1934. A diary for the years 1877 and 1878 is contained in Kansas Memory.

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George Washington Martin

This photograph shows George Washington Martin holding a unidentified child. In 1857 Martin migrated from Pennsylvania to the Kansas Territory settling in Lecompton, where he secured a position with the pro-slavery paper the, ?Lecompton Union?, later becoming the ?National Democrat?. He relocated to Junction City, Kansas, establishing a career as a newspaper editor and publisher with the founding of the ?Junction City Union?. Actively involved in the community, Martin held several public offices from mayor of Junction City to serving in the Kansas House of Representatives. In 1888 he moved to Kansas City, Kansas establishing the ?Daily Gazette? newspaper. Martin was the managing editor of the newspaper until 1899 when he is elected secretary of the Kansas Historical Society. For fifteen years he collected and preserved Kansas history. Martin resigned from this position in February 1914 and was appointed secretary emeritus of the Kansas Historical Society. On March 27, 1914 Martin passed away in Topeka, Kansas.

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