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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Daniel Read Anthony

Dudensing, R.

This engraving shows Daniel Read, Anthony, (1824-1904), brother of suffragist Susan B. Anthony. He migrated to the Kansas territory in 1854 as a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company and later settled in Leavenworth, Kansas; where he established a long and successfully career as a newspaper editor and publisher. Anthony owned and operated the Leavenworth Conservative, the Bulletin, and later, in 1871, the Leavenworth Times. With the outbreak of the Civil War he left the newspaper business to enlist in the Union army as a lieutenant colonel of the First Kansas Cavalry later reassigned as the Seventh Kansas Regiment. Anthony was involved in several skirmishes and battles during the Civil War but led troops to victory at the Battle of the Little Blue. In 1862, Anthony's military career was marked with controversy for not following orders issued under General Robert Mitchell's command. On September 3, 1862, he resigned from his post and returned to Leavenworth, Kansas. Anthony became actively involved in the community serving several terms on the city council and two terms as mayor of Leavenworth. He was also elected, in 1868, President of the Republican State Convention and served as President of the Kansas Historical Society from 1885 to 1886. For nearly a century Anthony was associated with the issues and concerns of Leavenworth, Kansas. On November 12, 1904, he passed away at the age of eighty in Leavenworth, Kansas.

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Daniel Read Anthony

This engraving shows Daniel Read Anthony, (1824-1904), brother of suffragist Susan B. Anthony. He migrated to the Kansas territory in 1854 as a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company and settled in Leavenworth, Kansas; where he established a long and successful career as a newspaper editor and publisher. Anthony owned and operated the Leavenworth Conservative, the Bulletin, and later, in 1871, the Leavenworth Times. With the outbreak of the Civil War he left the newspaper business and enlisted in the U.S. army as a lieutenant colonel of the First Kansas Cavalry, later reassigned as the Seventh Kansas Regiment. Anthony was involved in several skirmishes and battles during the Civil War but led troops to victory at the Battle of the Little Blue. In 1862, his military career was marked with controversy for not following orders issued under General Robert Mitchell's command. On September 3, 1862, he resigned from his post and returned to Leavenworth, Kansas. Anthony became actively involved in the community serving several terms on the city council and two terms as mayor of Leavenworth. He was also elected, in 1868, President of the Republican State Convention and served as President of the Kansas Historical Society from 1885 to 1886. For nearly a century Anthony was associated with the issues and concerns of Leavenworth, Kansas. On November 12, 1904, he passed away at the age of eighty in Leavenworth.

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James Henry Lane

Dudensing, R.

Portrait of James Henry Lane, 1814-1866, United States senator from Kansas, 1861-1866.

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Richard Josiah Hinton

A pencil drawing of Richard Josiah Hinton, 1830-1901. Hinton a New York journalist and an anti-slavery advocate moved to the Kansas territory in June of 1856 to battle against the expansion of slavery in the new territory. Shortly after his arrival in Lawrence, KS, Hinton soon advocated against slavery by writing to Eastern newspapers about the turbulent affairs in the Kansas territory. The numerous newspaper articles penned by Hinton reflected the individuals' views and opinions of a free-state without the institution of slavery. By the early part of 1862, Hinton was recruiting volunteers for the First Kansas Colored Infantry Regiment, and was appointed the rank of first lieutenant to the Regiment. He continued to move up in the military ranks with the promotion to captain of Company B, Second Kansas Colored on October 21, 1863. In November of 1856, Hinton mustered out of military service having reached the brevet rank of colonel. He finished the war serving as acting inspector general of the Freedman's Bureau as well as being sent to the South for secret service work ordered by President Abraham Lincoln. Following the war Hinton contributed articles to many different magazines and wrote several books, including John Brown and His Men: With Some Account of the Roads They Traveled to Reach Harpers Ferry (1894), an admiring biography of Hinton's old leader and hero. He, also, held several politically appointed positions within the federal government (i.e., United States commissioner of emigration in Europe in 1867; inspector of U.S. consulates in Europe; special agent to President Ulysses S. Grant to Vienna in 1873; special agent to the Departments of Treasury and State on the frontier and in Mexico in 1883; irrigation engineer to the U.S. Geological Survey from 1889-1890; and special agent in charge of the Department of Agriculture from 1890 to 1892.) While on business in London, England, Hinton died suddenly on December 20, 1901.

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