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Date -- 1900s (Remove)
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Page 1 of 4, showing 10 records out of 31 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Wright's Dry Goods store, Columbus, Kansas

An exterior view of Wright's Dry Goods store owned by Isaac Wright, Columbus, Kansas. Employees and possibly customers are posed in the doorways of the business. On the second floor of the building is the law office of C. D. Ashley

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Wallace business directory, Wallace, Kansas

This photograph shows a framed display board labeled, "Wallace, the Metropolis of Western Kansas. Directory of the thoroughly reliable business houses." There are 17 businesses advertised on the display, and many of the advertisement also contain photographs of the business buildings. Businesses listed include: Robert M. Auchard, Land, Loan and Insurance Agent; Peter Robidoux, Pioneer Merchant of Wallace; Felix T. Gandy, Real Estate Broker; Forker and McQuiston, Fresh and Salt Meats; Charles H. Musser, Sheet Metalware, Pumps, Stoves, Tinware, Iron pipe and fitting; Wallace County Register; Merchants Bank of Wallace; W. A. Oetzer, Druggist and Pharmacist; C. M. Henkel, Watchmaker and Jeweler; J. R. Hanger, Popular Barber Shop; B. I. Look and Company, Dry Goods and Clothing; A. J. Phillips, Fresh and Salt Meats; J. W. Dilworth, Grocery Headquarters; Law and Land Office; Dr. J. Haggart, Physician and Surgeon; Caufman and Coburn, Livery, Feed, and Sale Stables; and The Albany House.

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Williamson Franklin Boyakin

Forter, Emma Elizabeth Calderhead, 1857-

This is a portrait of Dr. Williamson Franklin Boyakin, who settled in Marysville, Marshall County in 1868 and opened a medical practice. In 1874, he was elected coroner of Marshall County, and a few years later he was elected County Superintendent of Schools. The portrait was copied from History of Marshall County Kansas, Its People, Industries and Institutions by Emma Elizabeth Calderhead Forter.

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Nelson Case

This black and white photograph shows Nelson Case, (1845-1921). Case a graduate of the University of Michigan settled in the town of Oswego, Kansas, in May 1869, to practice civil and criminal law. Considered an honest and honorable lawyer among his peers, Case was appointed a probate judge in June 1880, by Governor St. John. He was twice re-elected to the bench, but didn't seek a third term. Case soon returned to practicing law and crusading for prohibition. A long time supporter of the temperance movement, Case successfully banished saloons from the town of Oswego and rallied for the constitutional amendment of prohibition. Actively involved in the community, he held a number of elected and appointed positions. Case served as the city attorney of Oswego and was the editor of the Oswego Independent newspaper. He was also a member of the Republican Party, and was appointed to the Board of Regents at the State Normal School in Emporia. In his spare time, he authored a number of books including "The History of Labette County" and "The Constitutional History of the United States".

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Nelson Case

Romig, Robert W.

This sepia colored photograph shows Nelson Case, (1845-1921). Case a graduate from the University of Michigan settled, in May of 1869, in Oswego, Kansas to practice civil and criminal law. Considered an honest and honorable lawyer among his peers, Case was appointed, in June of 1880, by Governor St. John as a probate judge. He was twice re-elected to the bench but didn't seek a third term. Case soon returned to practicing law and crusading for prohibition. A long time supporter of the temperance movement, he successfully banished saloons from the town of Oswego and rallied for the constitutional amendment of prohibition. Actively involved the community, Case served as the city attorney of Oswego and the editor of the Oswego Independent newspaper. He was also a member of the Republican Party, and was appointed to the board of regents at the state normal school in Emporia. In his spare time, he authored a number of books including "The History of Labette County" and "The Constitutional History of the United States".

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Washburn Law School, Topeka, Kansas

This black and white photograph shows the Washburn Law School in Topeka, Kansas. The school opened its doors on September 17, 1903 at 118 West Eight Street. In 1911, the school moved to 725-27 Kansas Avenue to accommodate increasing enrollment. Within two years the institution was moving once again after Washburn trustees agreed to purchase the Bell Telephone building at 211 West Sixth Avenue. This location was intended to be the permanent home for the law school but due to renovation problems, the school moved to the Washburn Campus, in 1918, and into the basement of Crane Observatory until future accommodations could be made. A bicycle is visible outside of the building.

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Joseph B. Tomlinson

This black and white photograph shows Joseph B. Tomlinson, (1861-1922). Tomlinson, a native of Ohio, settled in Ottawa County, Kansas in 1881, to teach school and study law in the office of D.C. Chipman in Minneapolis, Kansas. He passed the bar, in 1890, and devoted his time and energy to up-holding the law and defending citizens' rights. In 1891, Kansas Governor William Stanley appointed Tomlinson warden of the Kansas State Penitentiary in Lansing, Kansas. During his brief tenure as warden, Tomlinson successfully managed to keep over 280 convicts from striking in the penitentiary coal mines without violence or outside assistance. He resigned from the warden's position, in 1901, to return to private life. In 1903, he moved to Independence, Kansas.

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William Eugene Stanley

This black and white photograph shows William Eugene Stanley, (1844-1910). Stanley, a native of Ohio, settled in Jefferson County, Kansas, in 1870 to practice law. He entered public service, in 1871, by serving as the Jefferson County attorney, (1871-1872). A few years later he became the Sedgwick County attorney, (1874-1880). In 1880, he made a political bid for a seat in the Kansas House of Representatives and served one term as a Republican from the ninety-second district, (1881-1883). Stanley resumed his political career in 1898, when he was elected the fifteenth governor of Kansas. He was also re-elected in 1901 to a second term. During his administration, the Kansas supreme court was increased to seven justices and funds were appropriated to finish the construction on the statehouse. Stanley left office on January 12, 1903 to return to private life in Wichita, Kansas, and to practice law. On October 13, 1910, William Eugene Stanley passed away at the age of sixty-six. He was later buried at the Highland Cemetery in Wichita, Kansas.

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William Eugene Stanley

This black and white photograph shows William Eugene Stanley, (1844-1910). Stanley, a native of Ohio, settled in Jefferson County, Kansas in 1870 to practice law. He entered public service, in 1871, by serving as the Jefferson County attorney, (1871-1872). A few years later he became the Sedgwick County attorney, (1874 to 1880). In 1880, he made a political bid for a seat in the Kansas House of Representatives and served one term as a Republican from the ninety-second district, (1881-1883). Stanley resumed his political career in 1898, when he was elected the fifteenth governor of Kansas. He was also re-elected in 1901 to a second term. Stanley left office on January 12, 1903 to return to private life in Wichita, Kansas and to practice law. On October 13, 1919, William Eugene Stanley died at the age of 66. He was buried at the Highland Cemetery in Wichita, Kansas.

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William Eugene Stanley

This sepia colored photograph shows William Eugene Stanley (front row wearing a dark suit) during military maneuvers for the Kansas National Guard in Ft. Riley, Kansas. Stanley entered public office in 1871. In 1898, he was elected as the fifteenth governor of Kansas, a position he held until 1903. Afterwards, he returned to Wichita, Kansas to practice law.

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