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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 12 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

After twenty-one years: the success story of Dr. John R. Brinkley

Brinkley Hospitals

This booklet was published by the Brinkley Hospitals of Little Rock, Arkansas. Brinkley moved his hospital operations to Little Rock from Milford, Kansas, after his Kansas medical license was revoked. He changed the name of his radio station to XERA and it was located in Villa Acuna, Mexico, just across the border from Del Rio, Texas, where the Brinkley's had a home. The pamphlet is a revised version of an earlier Brinkley hospital publication titled Your Health (Kansas Memory item 210693). It includes illustrations to accompany the medical information.

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Dr. Brinkley's doctor book

Brinkley Hospitals

This booklet was published by the Brinkley Hospitals of Little Rock, Arkansas. Brinkley moved his hospital operations to Little Rock from Milford, Kansas, after his Kansas medical license was revoked. The cover of the booklet indicated that the Brinkley Hospitals are "for the treatment of enlarged and infected prostate glands, rectal and colonic diseases, varicose veins, hernia, or rupture." He changed the name of his radio station to XERA and it was located in Villa Acuna, Coahuila, Mexico, just across the border from Del Rio, Texas, where the Brinkley's had a home. This volume claims that XERA is the most powerful radio station in the world. The pamphlet is a revised version of an earlier Brinkley hospital publication titled Your Health (Kansas Memory item 210693). It includes illustrations to accompany the medical information. There are some editing marks so this copy may have been used to plan a revision. It is an expansion of the information contained in "After Twenty One Years" (Kansas Memory item 213226).

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John Doy and rescue party

DaLee, Amon Gilbert

This black and white photograph shows John Doy and his rescue party. On January 25, 1859, Dr. John Doy and his son, Charles, left Lawrence, Kansas Territory for Nebraska with thirteen slaves. They were captured twelve miles outside of Lawrence and were taken to Weston, Missouri. The Doys were arraigned at Weston and were committed to jail at Platte City, Missouri, for the crime of abducting slaves. They remained in jail until March 20, 1859, when they were taken to St. Joseph, Missouri, where Dr. Doy was tried. After the trial, his son, Charles, was set free. The jury however could not agree on a verdict for Dr. Doy and he was tried a second time. At the second trial, he was convicted and sentenced to five years in the penitentiary. While being held in the St. Joseph jail, Doy was freed by friends from Kansas Territory on July 23, 1859. People in the photograph are: (l to r) Major James B. Abbott, Captain Joshua A. Pike, Jacob Senix, Joseph Gardner, Thomas Simmons, S. J. Willis, Captain John E. Stuart [Stewart], Charles Doy, Silas Soule, George R. Hay and Dr. John Doy (seated in front). The photograph was taken at Lawrence, Kansas Territory, in the summer of 1859.

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Dr. John R. Brinkley

Lippe Studio Del Rio, TX

Dr. John Brinkley standing outside of ruins of log building, in Del Rio, Texas.

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Dr. John R. Brinkley

Moore, Henry

Dr. John R. Brinkley in a graduation gown, possibly taken upon graduation from the Eclectic Medical University of Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri.

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Joseph Harrington Trego to an unidentified recipient [probably his wife, Alice Trego]

Trego, Joseph H. (Joseph Harrington), 1823-1905

Trego was in St. Louis, Missouri awaiting a boat trip to Kansas City. He describes his trip to that point as well as the weather. Trego was a doctor and he wrote about trying to locate his medicine chest for the second part of the journey. He also described his activities as he waited. It is not clear whether he had been to Kansas Territory before but he knew he was going to Sugar Mound in Linn County, Kansas Territory.

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Historic Psychiatry original miscellaneous documents

These are a variety of handwritten and typed letters, lectures, autographs, news clippings, biographical information, images and sketches, court documents, and other documents related to the history of psychiatry. These documents are housed in four boxes and the folders within are arranged alphabetically by surname or title, and they are included in the larger collection of historic psychiatry material in the Menninger Archives. Authors come from such fields as medicine, religion, prison and other reform and advocacy movements, politics, the military, etc. The documents themselves sometimes provide significant information, and sometimes they were collected because their authors were significant historical figures. Some of the individuals found in Box 1 include James Mark Baldwin, Ludwig Binswanger, Eugen Bleuler, Jean-Martin Charcot, Elizabeth Fry, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and Carl Jung. Some of the individuals found in Box 2 include Alfred Adler, Robert Frost, and Washinton Irving. This box also includes a 68-page handwritten notebook by Dr. W.W. Reed entitled "Reminiscenses About the Treatment of the Insane." Some of the individuals found in Box 3 include Amariah Brigham and Frederick van Eeden. This box also includes a correspondence file (1883-1888) on Ellen Kehoe, a patient at the Worcester Lunatic Hospital in Massachusetts, and a series of drawings from the 1920s and 1930s by a Belgian patient suffering from paranoia named Andreas at the Kankakee State Hospital in Illinois. The drawings were donated by Dr. J.B. Gier, formerly of the Topeka Veteran's Administration Hospital, who knew the patient and encouraged his work. Box 4 includes a miscellaneous folder regarding insane asylums and contains legal documents, postcard images, and receipts for services. Languages include English, German, French and Italian, and transcriptions or translations follow some of the documents.

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Dr. Martha Cunningham, Garnett, Kansas

This black and white photograph shows Dr. Martha Cunningham, seated in the buggy, with her sister Belle. The buggy is in front of her office at the corner of Fifth Avenue and Oak Street in Garnett, Kansas. A graduate from the Chicago School of Medicine, Martha and her reliable horse Prince made house calls for over twenty-five years in the Garnett community. Her name and office hours are on the door in the background.

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Dr. Martha Cunningham

This black and white photograph shows Dr. Martha Cunningham, one of the first female doctors to practice in Kansas. Martha was born on January 1, 1854, in Greencastle, Indiana. She moved to Kansas with her parents, in 1865, to a farm near Birch Swith, four miles southwest of Garnett, Kansas. She taught school for a few years before devoting her life to the medical profession. In 1886, Cunningham graduated from the Women's Division of the Chicago School of Medicine. She practiced for over twenty-five years in the Garnett community.

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John R. Brinkley

John R. Brinkley participating in a ground breaking ceremony at Del Rio, Texas for a future radio station. Mrs. Minnie (John R.) Brinkley and son, Johnny Boy, are standing beside him.

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