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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 28 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Annie (Le Porte) Diggs

Snyder

A portrait of Annie (Le Porte) Diggs, who was born in 1848 in Canada to an American mother and French father. Two years later the family moved to New Jersey, where she attended school. Diggs moved to Lawrence, Kansas, in 1873 and married Alvin S. Diggs shortly thereafter. While in Kansas, Diggs began to attend the local Unitarian Church and developed a strong sense of moral responsibility that prompted her to work for temperance and women?s suffrage. During 1882, Diggs and her husband published the newspaper Kansas Liberal, and beginning in 1890 she was the associate editor of the Alliance Advocate. As a radical reformer seeking to wipe out injustice, Diggs also allied herself with the Farmer?s Alliance, aiding in the creation of the People's (Populist) Party, serving on the Populist National Committee, and supporting the fusion of the Populist and Democratic parties in the 1898 election. Throughout this time she continued to work actively for women?s voting rights and served in the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association. In 1898, she was appointed the state librarian of Kansas, and she was also elected president of Kansas Press Women in 1905. Diggs moved to New York City in 1906, where she worked on two publications: The Story of Jerry Simpson (1908) and Bedrock (1912). She relocated to Detroit, Michigan, in 1912 and died there on September 7, 1916.

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Arthur Capper

An informal portrait of Kansas Governor Arthur Capper, 1865-1951, signing the "Bone Dry Law" passed by the Kansas Legislature. The law prohibited possession of liquor within the state and ended direct shipments of liquor to Kansas from out-of-state vendors. Capper, a native of Garnett, Kansas, served Kansas as Governor from 1915 to 1919, and as a U. S. Senator from 1919 to 1949.

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Carl A. Swensson

This black and white photograph shows Reverend Dr. Carl A. Swensson. He was the leader of the Swedish Lutheran Church and founder of Bethany College in Lindsborg, Kansas. The photograph was taken by Bror Gustaf Grondal in Lindsborg, Kansas.

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Charles Monroe Sheldon

Leonard, J. H.

This is a portrait of Reverend Charles Monroe Sheldon, pastor of Central Congregational Church, Topeka, Kansas. In the fall of 1896, Reverend Sheldon introduced a sermon story entitled "In His Steps or What Jesus Would Do." It was published in a weekly religious magazine from Chicago, and the response from readers was incredible and soon it was out in book form. Sales were spectacular. Some 20 other publishers discovered the story as it appeared serially and they too offered it in book form, without compensation to Sheldon since the stories were never copyrighted. In addition to his book, Sheldon started Tennesseetown kindergarten for African-American children.

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Gaspar Christopher Clemens

Downing, George

This black and white photograph shows Gasper Christopher Clemens. A Topeka attorney who represented clients from all walks of life. Clemens also gained the reputation as a lecturer who discussed the political issues of the day. When the Populist Party gained momentum in Kansas, Clemens became an active member and served in several positions. One was as legal adviser to Populist Governor Lorenzo D. Lewelling and the other as a court reporter to the Kansas Supreme Court. His battle for justice and equality for the common man, prompted Clemens to break away from the Populist Party, in 1897, and organize within the state the Socialist Party. In 1900, Clemens became the Socialist candidate for Kansas Governor and received about 1,200 votes. With this encouragement, he became the 1902 Socialist candidate for attorney general but was unsuccessful in his bid. After the defeat Clemens returned to his law practice to advocate and defend those in need.

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Gasper Christopher Clemens

This black and white photograph shows Gasper Christopher Clemens. A Topeka attorney who represented clients from all walks of life whom were believed to be falsely accused or denied their personal rights. Clemens also gained the reputation as a lecturer who discussed the political issues of the day. When the Populist Party gained momentum in Kansas, Clemens became an active member and served in several positions. One of those positions was legal adviser to Populist Governor Lorenzo D. Lewelling, and the other as court reporter to the Kansas Supreme Court. His battle for justice and equality for the common man prompted Clemens to break away from the Populist Party, in 1897, and to organize within the state the Socialist Party. In 1900, Clemens became the Socialist candidate for Kansas Governor and received about 1,200 votes. With this encouragement, he became the 1902 Socialist candidate for attorney general but was unsuccessful in his bid. After his defeat, Clemens returned to his law practice to advocate and defend those in need.

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Henry and Mary Worrall playing guitars

Guitarist and artist Henry Worrall of Topeka, Kansas, plays music with his wife, Mary Elizabeth Harvey Worrall. Henry and Mary frequently performed together in Cincinnati, Ohio, before moving to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868. Worrall's celebrated solo guitar instrumentals "Sebastopol" and "Spanish Fandango" enjoyed great popularity in the nineteenth century. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular solo guitar pieces played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Henry Worrall died in Topeka in 1902. Mary Worrall died in Topeka in 1915.

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Jeremiah ("Sockless Jerry") Simpson

Jerry Simpson in an 1892 debate with Chester I. Long for the seat in United States House of Representatives. Simpson debated Long at Harper, Kansas.

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John W. Clark

Photograph of John W. Clark who was a 2nd Lieutenant, Company B, 23rd Kansas Volunteer Infantry in the Spanish-American War. He served for four years in Cuba. Clark graduated in 1897 from Kansas University, Lawrence, Kansas, School of Law and was the first African-American to do so. Judge Clark also served as a justice of the peace. He died in 1930.

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John Whitnah Leedy house, Leroy, Kansas

This photograph represents the John Whitnah Leedy house in Leroy, Kansas. John W. Leedy was a Populist State Senator from 1893 to 1897, and Kansas Governor from 1897 to 1899. Standing at the left of the photograph is the eldest child of John W. and Sarah Leedy, Clara Romaine. To Clara's right in Margaret Amos, mother of John W. Beside her, is Sarah Leedy standing with her husband John W. and the Leedy's only son Boyd.

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