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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 22 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Kansas Free Lecture by Jas. H. Lathrop

A poster announcing a free lecture by Jas. H. Lathrop, Morgan City, Clay County, Kansas, at Union Hall, Cortland, New York. Lathrop was to speak of the suffering and depressed conditions caused by the grasshopper plague.

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Kansas Territory citizens to the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America

This unsigned statement was written to protest "the practice of taxing the people of the Territories for the support of a Government in which they are not represented." The residents of Kansas Territory complained that they had had no voice in how these tax dollars were appropriated, and they asked this "honorable body" to remit to them these taxes. Since this was during the drought of 1860, they declared that they would use these funds for famine relief.

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Relief!

This poster announces Rev. W. M. Wellman's visit to Goshen, Indiana, and his work on behalf of the Kansas Relief Committee and the Smith County Aid Society. Wellman worked to obtain financial donations for settlers impacted by the grasshopper plague.

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Patrons of Chase County

Wood, S. N. (Samuel Newitt)

S. N. Wood, Relief Agent for Chase County, and master of the Falls Grange subordinate chapter of the Patrons of Husbandry (Kansas State Grange), composed this circular for distribution to other subordinate granges in Chase County. The circular requests information on members' needs for farm relief. The circular demonstrates the broad, but often inadequate, network of social services provided by agricultural fraternities in the 1870s and the desperate conditions farmers faced during unfavorable economic or environmental conditions. George Wood (master of a subordinate grange in Chase County) provided his response by writing his answers in the margins.

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Report of the minority, in report and testimony of the select committee to Investigate the causes of the removal of the Negroes from the southern states to the northern states, in three parts

United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Negro Exodus

This report, written by the minority party of the Senate select committee investigating the Exodus, outlines the minority?s conclusions about the reasons for black emigration to the North during the Reconstruction period. This committee, composed of majority and minority parties, had taken testimony from hundreds of people having direct knowledge of the exodus movement. In essence, the minority party concluded that the Northern Republican Party and emigrant aid organizations had not persuaded blacks in the South to emigrate to the North. Instead, the unfavorable condition of life in the South had caused this mass exodus. The minority members were William Windom, a Republican senator from Minnesota, and Henry W. Blair, a Republican senator from New Hampshire.

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Report of the majority, in report and testimony of the select committee to investigate the causes of the removal of the Negroes from the southern states to the northern states, in three parts

United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Negro Exodus

This report, written by the majority party of the Senate select committee investigating the Exodus, outlines the majority?s conclusions about why Southern blacks were emigrating to the North during the post-Civil War period. This committee, composed of majority and minority parties, had taken testimony from hundreds of people having direct knowledge of the exodus movement. In essence, the majority party (the Democrats) concluded that blacks in the South had not emigrated due to ?any deprivation of their political rights or any hardship in their condition? in their home state. Furthermore, the report maintained that aid societies in the North (such as the Freedmen?s Aid Association of Topeka) were working with the Republican Party to encourage black emigration for purely political means. The majority party was composed of three senators: Daniel W. Voorhees (Dem., Indiana), Zebulon B. Vance (Dem., North Carolina), and George H. Pendleton (Dem., Ohio).

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Kansas grit

Strode, Josephine

Josephine Strode, a social worker in western Kansas, wrote this brief account of how Kansans coped during the 1930s Dust Bowl. She expresses the concerns of social workers who believe that government programs were not doing enough to relieve the burdens relief clients faced. The article also includes some popular "tall tales" circulating in the Dust Bowl. The article appeared in The Survey.

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An appeal for help in behalf of the colored refugees in Kansas

Rust, Horatio Nelson, 1828-1906

This flyer, distributed by the Southern Refugee Relief Association of Chicago, Illinois, describes the dire situation of the African-American refugees relocated in Kansas. The secretary of this association, Horatio N. Rust, had taken this opportunity to pass along information relayed to him by Elizabeth Comstock, an aid worker in Topeka. Comstock was thankful for the donations of food and other goods, but asked for more assistance in feeding, clothing, and sheltering these refugees. The flyer also includes short excerpts of letters by agents of the refugee association who had direct knowledge of the emigrants? situation.

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Samuel Clarke Pomeroy, Abstract of Report

Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891

Abstract of Report Showing the Operations of the Kansas Territorial Relief Committee to January 1, 1861

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An appeal from Kansas!

Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879

This circular describes the beginnings of the Territorial Executive Committee, which was in charge of collecting relief to aid the struggling settlers of Kansas Territory during the 1860 drought. This committee met in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, on November 14, 1860, and passed several resolutions. From one hundred and one delegates were present from twenty-four Kansas counties. Out of this number, four men, including Samuel Pomeroy, were elected officers. The circular concludes with "Suggestions and Directions to those who purpose Aiding us in our Distress."

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