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Page 1 of 9, showing 10 records out of 83 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Henry Adams to William Hutchinson

Adams, Henry J., 1816-1870

Henry J. Adams was in Washington, D. C., as a special agent of Kansas Territory attempting to convince the U.S. Congress to pay claims for damages suffered by Kansas citizens during episodes of violence in the territory. Adams reported on the prospects of getting the claims paid during the upcoming session of Congress as well as on his concerns about being compensated for his lobbying efforts. He expressed particular concern that Charles Robinson intended to cheat him out of his pay. Adams also commented on Abraham Lincoln's election as president, and the possible secession of Southern states in response to the election results.

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W. F. M. Arny to Thaddeus Hyatt

Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881

W.F.M. Arny, agent of the National Kansas Committee, continues to send Thaddeus Hyatt, president of this committee, copies of letters he had received from Kansas settlers. These letters describe the economic conditions resulting from the continued drought during 1860. The reports were submitted by Rev. J. W. Fox of Ridgeway, Kansas Territory; the "Committee on the Little Osage" of Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Dr. I. W. Robinson of Manhattan, Kansas Territory; and Joseph M. Todd and others of Greenwood Township in Greenwood County, Kansas Territory.

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William Frederick Milton Arny to Thaddeus Hyatt

Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881

W. F. M. Arny, an agent of the National Kansas Committee, wrote this letter to Thaddeus Hyatt while traveling on the Missouri River. The main focus of this letter revolved around committee business and the state of affairs in Kansas. During this visit to Kansas, Arny had reorganized the Kansas Central Committee in order to increase its efficiency, and he included in this letter a revised list of its officers and members. He also wrote about his conversation with Governor Geary concerning the various volunteer companies created by free state men. The letter ends with a brief description of the suffering of the settlers, their meager diet, and their desperate need for more provisions.

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National Kansas Committee letter

Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881

This printed letter is from the National Kansas Committee. Its purpose is to solicit money, supplies, and settlers for the Kansas Territory. It provides details on these efforts. Also, it mentions Colonel Buford's expedition to the territory and speculates on Southern motives.

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Charles Blair to John Brown

Blair, Charles

On April 15, 1857, Blair wrote Brown regarding the latter's report to him that the National Kansas Committee had turned down his request for funds to cover the first payment on the spears. Blair had stopped production, awaiting "further order from you," but said he was willing to make 500 instead of 1000 for the same rate.

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List of clothing articles

Bourne, S.

This is a detailed list of the articles of clothing sent to Kansas by the First Congregational Church in Flushing, New York. It includes dresses, frocks, coats, skirts, pants, drawers, shirts, socks, vests, boots and gloves as well as other items. The pastor of the church, S. Bourne, emphasized the quality and durability of the clothing.

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Thaddeus Hyatt

Brady, Mathew B., 1823 (ca.)-1896

This is a daguerreotype of Thaddeus Hyatt, an abolitionist and vigorous supporter of the Free-State party in Kansas. He was president of the National Kansas Aid Committee in 1856 and appointed Mrs. Clarina Irene Howard Nichols as a relief agent for western New York. Hyatt was not only acquainted with John Brown but started a relief fund for the Brown family after his execution December 2, 1859. In 1860-1861 he was instrumental in organizing the Kansas Relief Committee to combat another economic crisis caused by the great of drought in 1860. In August 1861, Hyatt was appointed American consul at La Rochelle, France, where he served until 1865. His interest in Europe did not end with the termination of his position as consul, and thereafter he divided his time between the two continents, crossing the Atlantic a total of 43 times before his death. In England, Hyatt became a pioneer in the cement business, building what was said to be the first concrete house in London in 1874. In the later years of his life, Hyatt resided in the United States but maintained a summer home at Sandown, Isle of Wight, where he died July 25, 1901.

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National Kansas Committee, Contributors List

Brown, John, 1800-1859

This list of "notes received for seeds" distributed by R. H. Waterman "under the direction of E. B. Whitman" is signed "John Brown Agt Nat. Kan. Com.," September 29, 1858. The notes were, according to Brown, given to him "in past payment or security on account."

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John Brown to J. T. Cox

Brown, John, 1800-1859

In this letter dated October 7, 1858, Ottumwa, John Brown again signs himself as an agent of the National Kansas Committee and claims to have the authority to receive from Cox any money or notes, etc., received from the Committee that he might have in his possession. Brown, of course, was continuing to tap all available sources for the financing of his operations, but not every one connected with the NKC would be supportive of these particular efforts.

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S. Chamberlin to Thaddeus Hyatt

Chamberlin, S.

This letter, written by S. Chamberlin, President of the LeRoy Kansas Aid Society, was addressed to Thaddeus Hyatt, chairman of the National Kansas Committee. This aid society in LeRoy, New York, was formed after a lecture presented by H.D. Northrup, an agent of the National Kansas Committee. The author immensely praised the speaking abilities of Northrup, likening him to the great orator Henry Clay. Chamberlin was firmly convinced that, if Northrup canvassed the North, he would be able to stir the hearts of Northerners in support of free state cause. This society also collected clothing and money to send to the free state settlers in Kansas.

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