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Date -- 1900s (Remove)
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Page 1 of 4, showing 10 records out of 37 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Arthur Jehu Stanley, Sr.

This is a cabinet card showing Arthur Jehu Stanley, Sr., who served in the Kansas House of Representatives from 1899-1900. Stanley, a Republican, represented District 86 in Lincoln County. He read law under the tutelage of a local lawyer in Lincoln, Kansas and was admitted to the Kansas Bar. Stanley moved his family to Kansas City, Kansas in 1911 where he practiced law for 44 years. In 1921, Arthur Jehu Stanley, Sr. served in the Kansas House of Representatives where he represented District 8, Kansas City, Kansas. His son, Arthur Jehu Stanley, Jr., joined his father in private practice in 1928 and later became a U.S. District Judge for the state of Kansas.

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Charles Blood Smith

Uhl, S. Jerome

Oil portrait of Charles Blood Smith by artist Jerome S. Uhl. The subject was a prominent Topeka lawyer who started a firm with William H. Rossington in 1876. The artist was a painter from Cincinnati, Ohio, who studied in Paris, exhibited in Europe, and painted portraits of a number of prominent Americans.

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Chiles Crittendon Coleman

This is a photograph of Chiles Crittendon Coleman, Kansas Attorney General from January 12, 1903 to January 14, 1907. Chiles was a Republican from Clay Center, Kansas.

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Edward Ray Sloan's diploma from Campbell College

This is Edward Ray Sloan's diploma from Campbell College, Holton, Kansas, where he received a degree of Bachelor of Laws. Edward Ray Sloan was born in 1883 in Seward County Nebraska. His family came to Kansas in 1886 locating in Sheridan County. Sloan graduated from Campbell College School of Law at Holton in 1904; however, Campbell's program lasted only two years and the Kansas Board of Law Examiners required a three-year course before taking the bar exam, so he entered Washburn College law school and graduated in 1905. He was elected county attorney of Sheridan County in the fall of 1904 and was re-elected twice while maintaining a private practice in Hoxie, Kansas. In July 1911, Sloan established with Guy L. Hursh the Holton law firm of Hursh & Sloan. In April 1912, Sloan was appointed Holton's city attorney, a position he held for 19 years. In 1930, Sloan helped establish the Topeka firm of Sloan, Hamilton and Sloan, which included his younger brother Floyd and W. Glenn Hamilton. It was the predecessor of the firm Sloan, Listrom, Eisenbarth, Sloan & Glassman. He served three terms in the Kansas House of Representatives from 1923 to 1929. In March 1931, he was appointed by Governor Woodring to fill a vacancy on the Kansas Supreme Court. Judge Sloan served the remaining 21 months of the term but opted not to seek election for another term. Later, he was appointed to the Kansas Corporation Commission and served as chairman from 1936 to 1938. In 1947, he was appointed Referee in Bankruptcy for the District of Kansas, where he served for 14 years. He was a lecturer at Washburn University Law School and compiled a textbook on bankruptcy.

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Edward Ray and Julia Wright Sloan

Long, Nelson

This is a photograph of Edward Ray and Julia Wright Sloan taken on their wedding day. Edward Ray Sloan later served three terms in the Kansas House of Representatives from 1923 to 1929. In March 1931, he was appointed by Governor Woodring to fill a vacancy on the Kansas Supreme Court. Judge Sloan served the remaining 21 months of the term but opted not to seek election for another term.

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Eugene Ware correspondence

This is a series of correspondence to and from Eugene Fitch Ware (1841-1911). Ware moved to Fort Scott, Kansas, after the Civil War and became employed at the Fort Scott Monitor. In 1879, Ware began the first of three terms in the Kansas State Senate. During his terms of office, Ware introduced bills concerning railroads, life insurance, militia, and relief and support of the poor as well as bills of a more local nature. Ware moved to Topeka in 1893 to become a partner with Charles Gleed and his brother, James, forming the law firm of Gleed, Ware and Gleed. In addition to journalism, law, and politics, Ware used the pseudonym, Ironquill, for his literary and poetic achievements. His works include "Neutralia" and "The Rhymes of Ironquill". For a complete contents list of the papers of Eugene Fitch Ware, see the External Links below.

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Former law office, Dighton, Lane County, Kansas

The former law office of Albert J. Beveridge, Dighton, Lane County, Kansas.

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Frank H. Doster, Chief Justice of the Kansas Supreme Court, 1897-1903

Portrait of Frank H. Doster (b. 1847, d. 1933), who served as the Chief Justice of the Kansas Supreme Court from 1897 to 1903. He was part of the Populist movement in Kansas and later became a socialist.

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Fremont Leidy

Rolfe & Colville

A portrait of Fremont Leidy, the son of Abram and Martha Leidy. He grew up on the family farm in Butler County, Kansas, attended high schools in Augusta and El Dorado, and graduated from Fort Scott Normal School in 1887. After graduation he accepted a position as principal at Severy Schools and two years later the superintendency of the Augusta schools. Three years later he entered law school at Kansas University and was admitted to practice in 1893. He opened an office at El Dorado where he practiced a short time. Health issues forced him to leave his law practice and he started a farm. In 1900 he was elected to the Kansas Senate, representing District 25 in Butler County and served for two years. Governor Stanley selected him as a member of the text-book commission. In 1908 he was reelected to the senate. On June 27, 1910, Leidy was appointed United State revenue collector for Kansas. He married Myrtle Jenkins on July, 1893 and they had three children: Pauline, Richard J., and Roger. Myrtle died on July 22, 1906 and he married A. Zota Martin on September 9, 1914.

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Harry Walter Colmery as a young boy.

This is a portrait of Harry Walter Colmery, 1890-1979, Topeka attorney, American Legion National Commander, and author of the G. I. Bill of Rights. The photograph was taken when he was a young boy.

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