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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 11 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Mamie Luella Williams

Christopher Studio, Topeka, Kans.

This is a portrait of Mamie Luella Williams, 1894-1986, principal of Washington School, Topeka, Kansas. In 1965 she was appointed to the Kansas Commission on the Status of Women, served as a delegate to the 1971 White House Conference on Aging, and was active on the Senior Citizens Advisory Council for the Republican Party for Kansas, 1974-1976. She received the Washburn University Distinguished Service Award in 1973, and an honorary doctorate in mathematics from Washburn in 1982. Williams Science and Fine Arts Elementary Magnet School at 1301 S.E. Monroe, Topeka, Kansas, was named in honor of Ms. Williams.

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Mamie Luella Williams

Portrait of Mamie Luella Williams, 1894-1986, an elementary school teacher and principal in Topeka, Kansas. In 1965 she was appointed to the Kansas Commission on the Status of Women, served as a delegate to the 1971 White House Conference on Aging, and was active on the Senior Citizens Advisory Council for the Republican Party for Kansas, 1974-1976. She received the Washburn University Distinguished Service Award in 1973, and an honorary doctorate in mathematics from Washburn in 1982. Williams Science and Fine Arts Elementary Magnet School at 1301 S.E. Monroe, Topeka, Kansas, was named in honor of Ms. Williams.

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Tennessee Town Kindergarten, Topeka, Kansas

This photograph shows June Chapman, standing, and Mary Jordan, seated, at tables with their students at Tennessee Town Kindergarten in Topeka, Kansas.

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Second grade students at Monroe School, Topeka

Schrock, John Edward

This photograph shows the second grade class of Monroe Elementary, with their teacher, Edna Vance, seated at the back of the classroom. In 1992 the Monroe School was designated a National Historic Landmark for its involvement in the Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka court case (1954), which determined that the racial segregation of schools was unconstitutional.

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Mamie Luella Williams

Portrait of Mamie Luella Williams, 1894-1986, an elementary school teacher and principal in Topeka, Kansas. In 1965 she was appointed to the Kansas Commission on the Status of Women, served as a delegate to the 1971 White House Conference on Aging, and was active on the Senior Citizens Advisory Council for the Republican Party for Kansas, 1974-1976. She received the Washburn University Distinguished Service Award in 1973, and an honorary doctorate in mathematics from Washburn in 1982. Williams Science and Fine Arts Elementary Magnet School at 1301 S.E. Monroe, Topeka, Kansas, was named in honor of Ms. Williams.

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Mamie Luella Williams

This is a photograph of Mamie Luella Williams, 1894-1986, with her students in front of a school, possibly Topeka, Kansas. In 1965 she was appointed to the Kansas Commission on the Status of Women, served as a delegate to the 1971 White House Conference on Aging, and was active on the Senior Citizens Advisory Council for the Republican Party for Kansas, 1974-1976. She received the Washburn University Distinguished Service Award in 1973, and an honorary doctorate in mathematics from Washburn in 1982. Williams Science and Fine Arts Elementary Magnet School at 1301 S.E. Monroe, Topeka, Kansas, was named in honor of Ms. Williams.

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Elisha J. Scott

Elisha J. Scott, 1890-1963, was raised in Topeka's Tennesseetown. As a youth, he possessed a strong drive and a quick wit, which attracted the eye of prominent Topeka minister Charles M. Sheldon. With financial support from Sheldon and his own abilities to succeed, Scott earned his law degree from Washburn College in 1916. During his long career as an attorney, he argued many civil rights and school segregation cases throughout Kansas and the Midwest. Two of Scott's sons, John and Charles, joined him in his law firm of Scott, Scott, Scott, and Jackson. Together they helped to prosecute, at the local level, the landmark civil rights case of Brown v. Topeka Board of Education.

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Paul E. Wilson to T. Justin Moore

Wilson, Paul E

In this letter, assistant attorney general Paul Wilson responded to T. Justin Moore?s query about the desegregation case Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka. Wilson writes that he is not fully informed of the current situation in Topeka, but that he believes the school board is beginning the integration process in anticipation of the court?s ruling that segregation is unconstitutional. He also mentioned that some contracts for African-American teachers had not been renewed because the board felt that many white parents would not want their children to be taught by black teachers. Wilson was a defense attorney for the Topeka school board and he argued their case before the Supreme Court. On May 17, 1954, Chief Justice Earl Warren handed down the ruling that segregated educational facilities were indeed unconstitutional.

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Major problem in Kansas--negro teachers hit by desegregation

Murphy, Anna Mary

This article describes how the desegregation of schools in the wake of the Brown v. Board of Education case would affect black schoolteachers across Kansas. The author gives the example of Topeka where, when the school board began desegregating schools prior to the final decision in the Brown case, black teachers lost their jobs. Although the school board wanted to ?avoid any disruption of the professional life of career teachers,? many schools were hesitant to place black teachers in classrooms containing both white and black students. Members of the black community who had opposed the Brown v. Board case at the local level had feared that integration would apply only to students, not to teachers, and it appeared to some that this would in fact be the case.

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A.S. Wilson to Henry J. Allen

Kansas. Governor (1919-1923 : Allen)

A.S. Wilson, an attorney in Galena, Kansas, writes to Governor Henry J. Allen to indicate his interest in a law that would allow second class cities to separate the schools based on "white and colored children." He included a petition with signatures with the letter.

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