Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Government and Politics -- Territorial Government (Remove)
Objects and Artifacts (Remove)
Community Life -- Religion (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Type of Material (Remove)
People (Remove)
Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 25 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

<< previous| 1 | 2 | 3|

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

S. L. Adair to the friends of Christ

Adair, Samuel Lyle

This letter reported on the current religious situation in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. According to the author, a missionary with the American Missionary Association, the residents had begun the preliminary steps for organizing a church. In Osawatomie there were a number of Baptists, Congregationalists, and Wesleyans, along with a large group who "make no profession of religion." Adair also wrote about the sickness that prevented more formal organization.

previewthumb

Samuel Lyle Adair to John Brown

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Samuel Adair wrote his brother-in-law John Brown from Osawatomie on October 2, 1857, to explain why he could not come see Brown in Iowa. Much of letter describes the general poor state of health in his locale, but he also comments on the political and especially the prospects for free state success in the upcoming election--Adair was not optimistic.

previewthumb

Samuel L. Adair to S. S. Jocelyn

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

From Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, Samuel Adair writes that his family has been sick, and that others in the area have been ill or died. The bulk of his letter to Reverend Jocelyn deals with elections held by both proslavery and antislavery supporters in October 1855 and the number of Missourians that voted in the proslavery election on October 1. He describes the territorial legislature that met at Shawnee Mission. He indicates that a relative and his son and son-in-law have arrived in Kansas Territory, and that the relative had brought a number of weapons. The relative to whom he referred was probably John Brown, who was a half brother of Adair's wife, Florella. Samuel Adair writes that he is concerned about Brown's war-like attitude and describes a slaveholder who had left the territory because of concern about the "outcome." This appears to be a draft of a letter sent to Jocelyn.

previewthumb

Samuel Lyle Adair to John Brown

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

From Osawatomie, Samuel Adair wrote his brother-in-law John Brown regarding monies Adair had received for the "free State men in Kansas" and specifies how these funds were distributed.

previewthumb

Samuel Lyle Adair's diary, 1854-1861

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

This diary, written by Samuel Lyle Adair, during the seven year period from 1854 to 1861, contains scattered entries about Kansas Territory and Adair's ministry. The first entry indicates that Adair and his wife are considering coming to Kansas Territory. Other entries relate to daily activities and Adair's ministry and include mentions of whom he visits and who is ill. The entry for February 4, 1861, notes that Kansas had been admitted to the Union.

previewthumb

List of clothing articles

Bourne, S.

This is a detailed list of the articles of clothing sent to Kansas by the First Congregational Church in Flushing, New York. It includes dresses, frocks, coats, skirts, pants, drawers, shirts, socks, vests, boots and gloves as well as other items. The pastor of the church, S. Bourne, emphasized the quality and durability of the clothing.

previewthumb

John S. Brown to Edward Everett Hale

Brown, John S.

John S. Brown wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Brown informed Hale that he had substituted for Rev. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, for the previous six months while Nute lectured in the East. Brown stated that he wanted to serve in Kansas as a missionary but lacked financial resources. He asked Hale for funds to support his missionary efforts.

previewthumb

John S. Brown to William Brown

Brown, John S.

This letter, written from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, by John Stillman Brown, was addressed to his son, William Brown, who was studying at Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire. The letter included information about their local church meetings and the talk surrounding the murder of Gaius Jenkins by James Henry Lane over a land dispute. Brown also mentioned a sermon he'd preached, which outlined the beliefs of the Unitarians. He admonished his son to immerse himself in the Scriptures, and to stop drinking tea and other stimulants. The letter concluded with a discussion of politics, particularly the Lecompton and Leavenworth Constitutions.

previewthumb

Mary Brown to William Brown

Brown, Mary Ann Day , 1816-1884

This letter, written by Mary Brown from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, was addressed to her brother, William, who was studying at Phillip Exeter Academy in New Hampshire. Mary and William were the children of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. The main focus of the letter is the story of how Dr. John Doy was captured by Missourians while aiding twelve fugitive slaves. Mary was convinced that someone had told the Missourians about the plan of escape. She also mentioned her father's religious work, and "Old" John Brown's work to free Missouri slaves.

previewthumb

M. M. Campbell to Brethren of the Osawatomie Bible Society

Campbell, M. M.

This letter, written by M. M. Campbell from Monrovia, Kansas Territory, requested information about the progress of colportage in the Osawatomie area, asking if they had divided the area into districts and appointed colporteurs to distribute religious materials to Kansas settlers. To encourage this, Campbell mentioned the great success of other colporteurs, such as Brother Blood from Manhattan, Kansas. He also encouraged the residents of Osawatomie to remain faithful to their duty as Christians, and to work for the furtherance of the kingdom. Campbell requested more detailed information about the local Bible Society.

previewthumb
<< previous| 1 | 2 | 3|

Government and Politics -- Territorial Government

Objects and Artifacts

Community Life -- Religion

Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions

Type of Material

People

Agriculture

Built Environment

Business and Industry

Collections

Community Life

Date

Education

Environment

Government and Politics

Home and Family

Military

Places

Thematic Time Period

Transportation