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Page 1 of 43, showing 10 records out of 428 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

John Brown portrait

Ruggles, Quartus E.

Oil portrait of John Brown, painted in 1882 by Quartus Ruggles. The famed abolitionist joined his sons in Kansas in 1855 and engaged in often violent activity directed at proslavery supporters. This portrait depicts Brown as he would have appeared after the Battle of Osawatomie, where free-state and proslavery bands clashed in 1856. The artist, Quartus Ruggles, never met Brown himself but painted this portrait over 20 years after the man?s death. It was displayed in the Society?s portrait gallery for many years.

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Vice President Charles Curtis

Acme News Pictures, Inc

This black and white photograph shows Vice President Charles Curtis throwing out the first baseball to start the game between Democratic and Republican members of the House of Representatives, Washington D. C. Curtis, the 31st Vice President of the United States (1929-1933), was the first Native American to be elected to that office.

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Samuel L. Adair to S. S. Jocelyn

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Samuel Adair and his family had just arrived in Kansas City, Missouri. This appears to be a draft of a letter he sent to Reverend S. S. Jocelyn of the American Missionary Society to describe the poor conditions for settlers in Kansas Territory, his and his wife's illnesses, and that the doctor who treated them owned slaves.

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Samuel L. Adair to William F. M. Arny

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Arny was a representative of the National Kansas Committee. In this letter, Adair inquires about various boxes and money that had been sent to the committee in Chicago to forward to people in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. Adair also seems to be responding to a request from Arny for information about settlers from Wisconsin in the Osawatomie area and also members of the Eldridge-Pomeroy party. Adair provides information on James Fuller, Thomas Roberts, Joseph Lawes and William and Wakeman (?) Partridge. He lists the names of four men who came with Eldridge and Pomeroy but provides no additional information about them. He also notes that he loaned Mr. Hyatt $50 and had an "order" for Arny to reimburse him.

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Samuel Lyle Adair to John Brown

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Samuel Adair wrote his brother-in-law John Brown from Osawatomie on October 2, 1857, to explain why he could not come see Brown in Iowa. Much of letter describes the general poor state of health in his locale, but he also comments on the political and especially the prospects for free state success in the upcoming election--Adair was not optimistic.

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Samuel L. Adair to Mrs. H. L. Hibbard

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Adair, writing from Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, reports on conditions in Kansas to Mrs. Hibbard, who was the president of the Woman's Kansas Aid and Liberty Association of Chicago, Illinois. Adair states that many recent emigrants are ill, and that others, who are using up their own reserves to help the emigrants, hope they will be repaid by aid received in Kansas. He reports that a group of Georgians camped near Osawatomie had run off more than 18 horses. Some free state men had prepared to confront them, but the Georgians had already left the area. Adair writes of rumors that a large force was coming to burn Osawatomie.

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Samuel L. Adair to Joseph Gordon

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

This is a copy of a letter written by Samuel Adair from Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. Adair thanks Reverend Gordon for $104 raised in Yellow Springs, Ohio, that was sent to James Garrison for "the benefit of sufferers in the cause of freedom in the Osawatomie vicinity." He describes the difficulties of distributing relief aid to everyone's satisfaction and mentions the Kansas Central Committee. He also writes of his concerns about how slavery and its demise will impact the nation using phrases such as "conflict of arms" and "fearful doom."

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Samuel L. Adair to Mary P. Green

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

In this letter, Samuel Adair thanks Mary P. Green for $35 sent by the ladies of La Salle County, Illinois. He indicates that he would try to distribute the money to "no unworthy person," and that it would help relieve the suffering in the territory. He indicates that things were comparatively quiet. He refers to a lack of cash if settlers are required to pay for their land soon, as he fells most would need to take out mortgages. He reports that those suffering the most are families who were sick or where the men were in prison. He expresses gratitude for the support received from the East.

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Samuel L. Adair to S. S. Jocelyn

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

In this draft letter, Samuel Adair writes from Hudson, Ohio, discussing his plans to meet with a "Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Society" party in Chicago. Adair indicates his family consisted of four people and describes the quantity of boxes and luggage they would bring with them. He also writes that he disapproved of traveling on the Sabbath.

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Walt Mason Poster

Adams, George Matthew

Poster advertising "Uncle Walt," a book of Walt Mason's prose poetry. The poster features a reproduction of the book's frontispiece, a cartoon by John T. McCutcheon. "Uncle Walt" was published in 1910 by George Matthew Adams of Chicago. Mason was a newspaper man who worked with William Allen White at the Emporia Gazette. The remainder of the illustrations were done by William Stevens, and the book was arranged and decorated by Will Bradley. William Allen White wrote the book's introduction, "A Poet of the People." George Matthew Adams ran a newspaper syndication service that syndicated the writing of both Mason and White.

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