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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Eula Gentzler papers

Gentzler, Eula (Eula A.), 1910-1992

This collection consists of letters written by Eula Gentzler to her parents in Topeka, Kansas, and official military correspondence as a U.S. Army nurse. Miss Gentzler referred to hospital ship activities, places she visited, and family references. Occasionally Eula expressed her thoughts on the war. Eula A. Gentzler was born November 10, 1910, in Belleville, Kansas. Her father Ernest T. Gentzler was a fireman for the Union Pacific Railroad. The family moved to Topeka when Eula was, approximately, thirteen years old. She graduated from Topeka High School and, later, the Asbury Hospital School of Nursing in Salina, Kansas, in 1937. She enlisted in the U. S. Army Nurse Corps in October, 1942. She was discharged in Octorber, 1945, but was recalled during the Korean conflict serving from 1951 to 1957. Miss Gentzler was sent to Europe in the fall of 1943. She was assigned to duty on the hospital ships Shamrock and Arcadia, working in surgery as well as the wards. Both carried approximately 800 patients. The ships carried injured servicemen from North Africa and Europe to the U. S., requiring six weeks to make a trip across, pick up a load of patients, and return. When in the war zone, they would get patients during battles and would then work extended shifts. Miss Gentzler recalled that during the battle at Enzio, they started surgery at 1 p.m. and operated until 5 a.m. the next morning. On another occasion, they picked up a load of British sailors whose mine sweeper had been bombed and the hospital crew worked all night until they ran out of supplies. Eula Gentzler died on April 13, 1992.

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Graves Drug Store, Garnett, Kansas

Interior view of Graves Drug Store. Shown is the soda fountain, employees, and a customer.

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Reception at the Nazareth Convent, Concordia, Kansas

This photo was taken on St. Joseph's Day during a reception at the Nazareth Convent, Sisters of St. Joseph, Concordia, Kansas. The group of young postulants are preparing to enter the chapel at the convent to celebrate accepting the habit of the Sisters of St. Joseph and becoming novitiates. A year later, again on St. Joseph's Day, they will celebrate their "first profession day" and take their vows. The girls on the steps in descending order are: Anna Herman, Julia Galen, Patricia McKenna, Marie Kelley; and Sisters Henrietta Bueche, Mildred Huber, Evangeline Thomas, Ovide Bertrand, Dympna Hamel, Elizabeth Belisle. Girls, left to right: Donna Rose Desilet, Connie Chaput, Ronalda Cote, Marcia Warthern, Anita Bissette.

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VOX-KOP: the voice of the Kansas Ordnance Plant

Kansas Ordnance Plant (Parsons, Kan.)

This employee newsletter was published at the Kansas Ordnance Plant in Parsons, Labette County, Kansas, during World War II, until it was halted because of the paper shortage. It contains news about the employees, their families, and soldiers from the area, and includes many pictures. The Kansas Historical Society has issues beginning with volume 1, no. 22, September 21, 1942 through July 30, 1943. Issues published in 1943 are available as Kansas Memory unit 444027.

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