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Page 1 of 7, showing 10 records out of 68 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Bethel College

This is a photograph of the students, faculty, and graduates of Bethel College, Newton, Kans. They appear to be at the back or a side of the Administration Building.

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Bluemont Central College (later Kansas State University) founders and early professors, Manhattan, Kansas

This is a photograph of Robert L. Harford, J. G. Schnebly, Washington Marlatt, Joseph Denison, and Isaac T. Goodnow, the first five professors at Bluemont Central College, which later became Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas.

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Ellen Douglas Denison Goodnow to Isaac Tichenor Goodnow

Goodnow, Ellen Douglass Denison, 1812-1890

Ellen Goodnow wrote from Shannon, Kansas Territory, to her husband, Isaac, who was traveling in Boston. Ellen asked that he purchase winter supplies for the family and neighbors while he was on the East Coast, and listed their necessities. The letter includes a short note from Joseph Denison, informing Isaac that more money was needed than expected to support the college through the winter.

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Ellen Douglas Denison Goodnow to Isaac Tichenor Goodnow

Goodnow, Ellen Douglass Denison, 1812-1890

Ellen Goodnow wrote from Shannon, Kansas Territory, to her husband Isaac, who was traveling on the East Coast. In this letter, which is largely personal, Ellen Goodnow describes a frightening conflict between white settlers in the area and members of the Cheyenne Indian tribe. A neighbor had awakened her in the middle of the night to enlist men to fight alongside members of the Delaware Indians, who had also been attacked by the Cheyennes. Isaac's brother, William, had lead her to safety in Manhattan.

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Ellen Douglas Denison Goodnow to Isaac Tichenor Goodnow

Goodnow, Ellen Douglass Denison, 1812-1890

Ellen Goodnow wrote to her husband, Isaac Goodnow, from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, briefly relating the news of a friend's sudden death. She attached a list of items she wished Isaac to purchase while he was in the East, which mostly consisted of clothing items, but also included a clock and a microscope.

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Ephraim Nute to Amos Adams Lawrence

Nute, Ephraim

Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. In a letter marked "private", Ephraim Nute wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Amos A. Lawrence in Massachusetts. Nute responded to Lawrence's suggestion that the college sit on the "broad table land on Mt. Oread or Capitol hill"; he supported the idea but feared that issues surrounding the land title would compromise the plan. Nute agreed with Lawrence about the importance of establishing schools, but he also concerned that the current political situation was not conducive to it, as the Territorial government was in the hands of "usurpers". He felt that "only one life now stands between us and the reopening of the civil war."

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Ephraim Nute to Amos Adams Lawrence

Nute, Ephraim

Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote to Amos A. Lawrence in Massachusetts, regarding the subject of a college. A well-attended town meeting had been held in which the idea had been discussed, though all seemed only "a castle in the air" but for Lawrence's "liberal offer" (presumably of funding) which was the "first step toward the realization of his project." The general opinion of the people was that the college should be constructed outside the town limits "on the high prairie or table land." Nute also mentioned the steps being taken to establish free public schools in the city, of upper and lower grades.

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Ernest Hiram Lindley

This black and white photograph shows Ernest Hiram Lindley, (1869-1940), the seventh chancellor of the University of Kansas, (1920-1939). During his first few years as chief executive officer he successfully secured $3.5 million dollars from the Kansas Legislature for building appropriations. With these funds a number of buildings were constructed across campus including: Hoch Auditorium, Strong Hall, Watson Library and the women's first dormitory, Corbin Hall. He was also instrumental in expanding the school's instructional offerings by establishing a school of business, and a school of chemical engineering and preventive medicine. For nineteen years, Lindley served as the chancellor of the University of Kansas, longer than anyone before him. However, after enduring a number of difficult years with the State Board of Administration over employment practices, he resigned on June 30, 1939. A year later the seventy-year old educator became ill while traveling abroad. He later died, on August 21, 1940, aboard the passenger liner Asama Maru with burial conducted at sea.

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Ernest Hiram Lindley

This black and white photograph shows Ernest Hiram Lindley, (1869-1940), the seventh chancellor of the University of Kansas, (1920 -1939). During his first few years as chief executive officer he successfully secured $3.5 million dollars from the Kansas Legislature for building appropriations. With these funds a number of buildings were constructed across campus including: Hoch Auditorium, Strong Hall, Watson Library and the woman's first dormitory Corbin Hall. He was also instrumental in expanding the school's instructional offerings by establishing a school of business, and a school of chemical engineering and a school of preventive medicine. For nineteen years Lindley served as the chancellor of the University of Kansas, longer than anyone before him. However, after enduring a number of difficult years with the State Board of Administration over employment practices he resigned on June 30, 1939. A year later the seventy-year old educator became ill while traveling abroad. He later died, on August 21, 1940, aboard the passenger liner Asama Maru burial was conducted at sea.

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Ernest Hiram Lindley

This black and white photograph shows Ernest Hiram Lindley, (1869-1940), the seventh chancellor of the University of Kansas, (1920-1939). During his first few years as chief executive officer he successfully secured $3.5 million dollars from the Kansas Legislature for building appropriations. With these funds a number of buildings were constructed across campus including: Hoch Auditorium, Strong Hall, Watson Library and the women's first dormitory, Corbin Hall. He was also instrumental in expanding the school's instructional offerings by establishing a school of business, and a school of chemical engineering and preventive medicine. For nineteen years Lindley served as the chancellor of the University of Kansas, longer than anyone before him. However, after enduring a number of difficult years with the State Board of Administration over employment practices, he resigned on June 30, 1939. A year later, the seventy-year old educator became ill while traveling abroad. He later died, on August 21, 1940, aboard the passenger liner Asama Maru with burial conducted at sea.

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