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Page 1 of 397, showing 10 records out of 3966 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

John Brown portrait

Ruggles, Quartus E.

Oil portrait of John Brown, painted in 1882 by Quartus Ruggles. The famed abolitionist joined his sons in Kansas in 1855 and engaged in often violent activity directed at proslavery supporters. This portrait depicts Brown as he would have appeared after the Battle of Osawatomie, where free-state and proslavery bands clashed in 1856. The artist, Quartus Ruggles, never met Brown himself but painted this portrait over 20 years after the man?s death. It was displayed in the Society?s portrait gallery for many years.

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Seelye's Almanac, Health Guide, and Cook Book; Abilene, Kansas

A. B. Seelye's Medicine Company

These images show the booklet titled Seelye's Almanac, Health Guide, and Cook Book, published by A. B. Seelye Medical Company in Abilene, Kansas. The approximately 50-page booklet contains advertisements and testimonials for Ner-Vena, Wasa-Tusa, Magic Cough and Consumption Cure, Seelye's Wintergreen Ointment, Wintergreen Soap, A. B. Seelye's Happy Life Pills, Seelye's Universal Stock and Poultry Powder, Horse Liniment, Seelye's Hair Tonic and Restorative, and other remedies. There are also advertisements for powdered spices, flavoring extracts, and household recipes. Almanac information about such things as calendars, phases of the moon, and weather forecasts are also included. The cookbook section begins on page 41.

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Vice President Charles Curtis

Acme News Pictures, Inc

This black and white photograph shows Vice President Charles Curtis throwing out the first baseball to start the game between Democratic and Republican members of the House of Representatives, Washington D. C. Curtis, the 31st Vice President of the United States (1929-1933), was the first Native American to be elected to that office.

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S. L. Adair to the friends of Christ

Adair, Samuel Lyle

This letter reported on the current religious situation in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. According to the author, a missionary with the American Missionary Association, the residents had begun the preliminary steps for organizing a church. In Osawatomie there were a number of Baptists, Congregationalists, and Wesleyans, along with a large group who "make no profession of religion." Adair also wrote about the sickness that prevented more formal organization.

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Kansas Territory marriage ceremonies performed by Rev. Samuel L. Adair

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

This item lists the twenty-one marriage ceremonies Samuel L. Adair performed in Kansas Territory from 1855 to 1861. For each ceremony, Adair identified the bride and groom, the location (often a home), and the date.

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Samuel L. Adair to S. S. Jocelyn

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

This letter was written in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, to Reverend Jocelyn, who was Samuel Adair's contact with the American Missionary Association. The first three pages deal with some disagreement over Adair's salary and support that was to be provided by the association, his efforts on behalf of religion, and prospects for a "union" church building that would be shared by several denominations. The last page discusses economic conditions in Kansas Territory and the difficulty of getting items to Kansas either via the Missouri River or by overland freighting from St. Louis. This appears to be a draft of a letter sent to Jocelyn.

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Samuel Lyle Adair's diary, 1854-1861

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

This diary, written by Samuel Lyle Adair, during the seven year period from 1854 to 1861, contains scattered entries about Kansas Territory and Adair's ministry. The first entry indicates that Adair and his wife are considering coming to Kansas Territory. Other entries relate to daily activities and Adair's ministry and include mentions of whom he visits and who is ill. The entry for February 4, 1861, notes that Kansas had been admitted to the Union.

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Samuel Lyle Adair to John Brown

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Samuel Adair wrote his brother-in-law John Brown from Osawatomie on October 2, 1857, to explain why he could not come see Brown in Iowa. Much of letter describes the general poor state of health in his locale, but he also comments on the political and especially the prospects for free state success in the upcoming election--Adair was not optimistic.

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Samuel L. Adair's sermon records, 1855-1860

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

This is a record of sermons given by Samuel L. Adair. The information includes the biblical text, the date, the place where the sermon was given, and the subject (including funeral sermons) for sermons delivered between 1855 and 1860. Later entries also include brief remarks. Many of the sermons were given in homes, so these locations provide some idea of the neighborhood. This item is a subset (pages 25-53) of Adair's full sermon records.

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Samuel L. Adair to Joseph Gordon

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

This is a copy of a letter written by Samuel Adair from Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. Adair thanks Reverend Gordon for $104 raised in Yellow Springs, Ohio, that was sent to James Garrison for "the benefit of sufferers in the cause of freedom in the Osawatomie vicinity." He describes the difficulties of distributing relief aid to everyone's satisfaction and mentions the Kansas Central Committee. He also writes of his concerns about how slavery and its demise will impact the nation using phrases such as "conflict of arms" and "fearful doom."

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