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Page 1 of 5, showing 10 records out of 48 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok

Blakeslee, W.

This studio portrait shows James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok in buckskins (1837-1876). The legendary lawman and gun-slinger began his career in 1858 as peace officer of the Monticello Township in the Kansas Territory of Johnson County. For a number of years Hickok also worked as a government scout, guide and deputy U.S. marshal across the Great Plains. His reputation as a skilled marksman proceeded him wherever he went. In 1869 Hickok was elected marshal of Hays, Kansas and sheriff of Ellis County, Kansas. A role he served until 1870. In 1871, he was hired as Abilene, Kansas' town marshal. As marshal he earned fame for being a quick draw and for spending most of his time playing cards. Hickok was killed on August 01, 1876 while playing a game of poker at a saloon in the Deadwood, Dakota Territory.

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George Washington Brown to Eli Thayer

Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915

George Washington Brown, editor of the Herald of Freedom newspaper, was one of seven free state leaders arrested on May 14, 1856 on charges of high treason and held prisoner by federal troops near Lecompton. G. W. Brown described the sack of Lawrence and the destruction of his printing press, commented upon the harshness of his prison conditions, and asked Eli Thayer to do anything in his power to help secure his release.

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John S. Brown to William Brown

Brown, John S.

This letter, written from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, by John Stillman Brown, was addressed to his son, William Brown, who was studying at Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire. The letter included information about their local church meetings and the talk surrounding the murder of Gaius Jenkins by James Henry Lane over a land dispute. Brown also mentioned a sermon he'd preached, which outlined the beliefs of the Unitarians. He admonished his son to immerse himself in the Scriptures, and to stop drinking tea and other stimulants. The letter concluded with a discussion of politics, particularly the Lecompton and Leavenworth Constitutions.

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John Brown to Thomas Russell

Brown, John, 1800-1859

From his jail cell in Charles Town, Virginia, just days before he was to go on trial for treason, John Brown wrote seeking legal counsel for himself and fellow prisoners. Brown mentioned his wounds, but said they were "doing well," expresses special concern for "the young men prisoners," and closed "Do not send an ultra Abolitionist."

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James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok

Forney's Studio

This formal portrait taken in Abilene, Kansas shows James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok (1837-1876). The legendary lawman and gun-slinger began his career in 1858 as peace officer of the Monticello Township in the Kansas Territory of Johnson County. For a number of years Hickok also worked as a government scout, guide and deputy U.S. marshal across the Great Plains. His reputation as a skilled marksman proceeded him wherever he went. In 1869 Hickok was elected marshal of Hays, Kansas and sheriff of Ellis County, Kansas. A role he served until 1870. In 1871, he was hired as Abilene, Kansas' town marshal. As marshal he earned fame for being a quick draw and for spending most of his time playing cards. Hickok was killed on August 01, 1876 while playing a game of poker at a saloon in the Deadwood, Dakota Territory.

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James Griffing to J. Augusta Goodrich

Griffing, James S. (James Sayre), 1822-1882

James Griffing wrote from the steamboat New Lucy on the Missouri River to his fiancee, J. Augusta Goodrich, in Owego, New York. Griffing, a Methodist minister, was on his way back to New York to get married. He commented upon the concerns that Ms. Goodrich likely was experiencing as she prepared to leave her New York home to join him in Kansas Territory. Griffing tried to convince Ms. Goodrich that they would make a good home for themselves in Kansas. He also expressed the opinion that the "excitement upon the slavery question" in Kansas Territory was exaggerated, and that serious violence over the issue was unlikely.

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W. E. Hall to Governor John A. Martin

Hall, W. E.

W. E. Hall, an owner of a hardware store in Burlington, writes to Governor John A. Martin in Topeka about a petition for pardoning two Burlington druggists by the names of Sean and Wattles who were jailed for a technical violation of the alcohol prohibition law. Hall expresses his support for prohibition, but assures Governor Martin that he believes the case of the druggists truly deserves clemency.

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James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok to Polly Butler Hickok

Hickok, Wild Bill, 1837-1876

Letter written by James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok, from someplace in Kansas, to Polly Butler Hickok, Troy Grove, Illinois. He complains that he has received few letters from her. Hickok will not tell his mother what he is doing in Kansas, but he offers to tell her later. He writes that the "excitement" is pretty much over, and he has seen some sights that would make one sick.

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James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok to Lydia Hickok

Hickok, Wild Bill, 1837-1876

James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok, [Monticello?, Kansas Territory] to his sister Lydia Hickok, Troy Grove, Illinois. He is disappointed to have not received many letters upon his arrival. Hickok has written to many acquaintances but received few letters. He gives regards to friends, especially certain women; wishes he had a photograph of Hannah Edwards. He tells of having seen [James A.] Harvey, a captain of "abolition trators" [sic].

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James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok to Horace Hickok.

Hickok, Wild Bill, 1837-1876

Letter written by James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok, Monticello, Kansas Territory, to his brother Horace Hickok. He relates that he was in Lecompton tending to his claim and has the best lawyer in Kansas. Hickok will have 160 acres soon. He talks about recipient possibly coming to Kansas in the spring. Says to tell mother he has not been drinking or gambling and the next time he goes to Lawrence, he'll send a photo so she can see if he looks "clean." Hickok has been haying for 5 days. His roommate, Guy, is deathly sick. He [Hickok] is quiet much of the time. Asks about acquaintances and talks about marriage. Guy has bought land in Douglas County and he doesn't swear or drink. Hickok has been hunting and game is plentiful.

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