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Page 1 of 1, showing 8 records out of 8 total, starting on record 1, ending on 8

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

William Addison Phillips

Portrait of William Addison Phillips, an author, lawyer, journalist and politician. In 1857, Phillips attended the Constitution Convention at Topeka and the Free State Conventions at Centropolis, Lawrence, and Grasshopper Falls. He founded the town of Salina in April, 1858. In that same month and year, Phillips was nominated at the Topeka Free-State Convention under the Leavenworth Constitution to serve as a supreme court judge. He attended the Convention at Osawatomie and the Republican State Convention at Lawrence in 1859. Phillips served in the Kansas Volunteer Regiments and rose to the rank of colonel. From March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1875 Phillips was an at large representative to the United States Congress and from March 4, 1875 to March 3, 1879 he represented the First District.

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Edward Russell

This is a portrait of Edward Russell, a newspaperman and politician. He came to Kansas Territory in 1856, and located in Elwood, in Doniphan County, Kansas. Shortly after moving to Kansas, Russell started a newspaper that espoused the free-state side. In August, 1858, he lobbied Doniphan county citizens against the Lecompton Constitution. In that same year, Russell, D. W. Wilder and others founded a free-state paper. Russell later served in the Kansas legislature, and held several state offices.

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George Henry Hoyt

A portrait of George Henry Hoyt, a resident of Leavenworth, Kansas. He served as Kansas Attorney General from 1867 to 1869. During the Civil War, he was Captain of Company K, Seventh Kansas Volunteer Cavalry and promoted to Lieutenant Colonel of the Fifteenth Kansas Volunteer Cavalry.

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Hugh A. Cook with his wife and children

Lamon, W. H.

Portrait of Mr. & Mrs. Hugh A. Cook and their three eldest children. He was the second Sheriff of Franklin County, Kansas. Photo taken by W. H. Lamon, Lawrence, Kansas.

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Hugh A. Cook with his wife and children

Lamon, W. H.

Portrait of Mr. & Mrs. Hugh A. Cook with three children and their dog. Cook was the second Sheriff of Franklin County, Kansas. Photo taken by W. H. Lamon of Lawrence, Kansas.

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Forest Savage

This black and white photograph shows Forest Savage, (1826-1915), copied from the book "A History of Lawrence, Kansas: From the First Settlement to the Close of the Rebellion" by Richard Cordley. Savage, a musician and member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company, migrated, on August 29, 1854, to Lawrence, Kansas with brother John. After their arrival to the Kansas Territory on September 11, 1854, the men founded the first musical band in Kansas. The newly formed band grew in membership and became instrumental in entertaining settlers and troops in the days leading up to the start of the Civil War. In October of 1864, during Price's Raid, the band went into battle and served as a militia band for nearly two weeks before returning home. Their military career's were short lived but their musical careers would live on. In 1867, the musicians would play for the first commencement at the University of Kansas. On September 15, 1879, the remaining members of the band, including Forest Savage, gathered one last time to performed for the twenty-fifth anniversary of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's arrival to Lawrence, Kansas. Forest Savage lived his remaining years in the town he migrated to as a young man. On August 17, 1915 at the age of eighty-nine, he passed away quietly in his home. Burial was conducted in Oak Hill Cemetery in Lawrence, Kansas.

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John Palmer Usher

This photograph shows John Palmer Usher,1816-1889, a lawyer from Indiana and a member of President Abraham Lincoln's cabinet. Usher servers only two years as the seventh U.S. Secretary of the Interior,1863-1865, before returning to private life. In 1865, he becomes the chief counsel for the Kansas Pacific Railroad a position he holds until his retirement in 1880. Usher also resumes his political career when he moves to Lawrence, Kansas, in 1872, and is elected to serve one term as the town's mayor, 1879 to 1881. On April 13, 1889, at the age of seventy-three, he passes away at the University Hospital in Philadelphia after a lengthy illness. Burial is at the Oak Hill Cemetery in Lawrence, Kansas.

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Daniel Read Anthony

This carte de visite shows Daniel Read Anthony, (1824-1904), brother of suffragist Susan B. Anthony. He migrated to the Kansas territory, in 1854, as a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company and settled in Leavenworth, Kansas; where he established a long and successfully career as a newspaper editor and publisher. Anthony owned and operated the Leavenworth Conservative, the Bulletin, and later, in 1871, the Leavenworth Times. With the outbreak of the Civil War he left the newspaper business and enlisted in the Union army as a lieutenant colonel of the First Kansas Cavalry, later reassigned as the Seventh Kansas Regiment. Anthony was involved in several skirmishes and battles during the Civil War but successfully led troops to victory at the Battle of the Little Blue. In 1862, his military career was marked with controversy for not following orders issued under General Robert Mitchell's command. On September 3, 1862, he resigned from his post and returned to Leavenworth, Kansas. Anthony became actively involved in the community serving several terms on the city council and two terms as mayor of Leavenworth. He was also elected, in 1868, President of the Republican State Convention and served as President of the Kansas Historical Society from 1885 to 1886. For nearly a century Anthony was associated with the issues and concerns of Leavenworth, Kansas. On November 12, 1904, he passed away at the age of eighty in Leavenworth.

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