Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Date -- 1800-1820 (Remove)
Government and Politics (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 12 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

<< previous| 1 | 2|

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Samuel Lyle Adair family

Cased sixth plate daguerreotype portrait of Samuel Adair, Charles Storrs Adair, Florella Brown Adair, and Emma Florilla Adair. The family settled near Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, where Adair was a minister and free state supporter. His wife was a half sister to John Brown and he occasionally stayed with the Adairs. The family was involved in various free state and relief activities.

previewthumb

Johnston Lykins

Johnston Lykins was a well-known missionary, physician, and translator who worked with the Pottawatomi and Shawnee Indians who had moved to Indian Territory (present-day Kansas) after the passage of the Indian Removal Act in 1830. In 1831, after serving as a missionary to the Indian tribes in Indiana and Michigan, Lykins and his first wife Delilah (McCoy) Lykins moved to Indian Territory. Lykins and his father-in-law, Isaac McCoy, established the Shawnee Indian Baptist Mission in present-day Johnson County, Kansas. In addition to his responsibilities as a physician, Lykins worked as a translator and developed a system of Indian orthography that allowed the Shawnee people to read and write in their native language. He edited and published the first paper printed in Shawnee, called the Sinwiowe Kesibwi (Shawnee Sun). In the spring of 1843, Lykins founded a mission among the Pottawatomi near what is today Topeka. Due, perhaps, to inter-denominational conflicts and other problems with the mission, Lykins left the Pottawatomi mission and moved to Kansas City, Missouri. He served as the second mayor of Kansas City in 1854, and he remained in residence there until his death in 1876.

previewthumb

Thomas L. McKenney to James Barbour

McKenney, Thomas Loraine, 1785-1859

Thomas McKenney, the current Superintendent of Indian Affairs, wrote this letter to James Barbour, Secretary of War, explaining the perceived success of the government?s attempts to ?civilize? Indian tribes. As part of this process of ?civilization,? the government believed that it was necessary for native groups to become assimilated into white American society by adopting white agricultural methods, Christianity, and other elements of European American culture. Thomas McKenney was a passionate proponent of this system, and so he included a transcription of a letter written by a Cherokee man named David Brown who describes how his people had adopted Christianity, a republican form of government, and other elements of white culture. According to McKenney, as well as many other white Americans during this time period, the ?civilization? process had a positive effect on Native Americans. McKenney also advocated Indian removal, writing that ?should they retain their present location [within the United States] they will, in the course of a few years, be lost as a race.?

previewthumb

Johnston Lykins journal entry, undated

Lykins, Johnston, 1800?-1876

In this undated journal entry, Johnston Lykins, a Baptist missionary to the Shawnee of northeast Kansas, gives his perspective on how the U.S. government and Indian agents have treated emigrant Indians in Kansas. He also discusses how many of these Indian tribes are suffering from starvation.

previewthumb

No-tin-no to D. D. Mitchell

No-tin-no

No-tin-no, a leader of the Ottawa nation, wrote this letter to the Superintendent of Indian Affairs, D. D. Mitchell, concerning a shipment of farming implements that the government had promised to the tribe. The Ottawa were frustrated by the delay, and No-tin-no stated that if he did not hear back from Mitchell, he would write to the President of the United States himself. The letter was dictated to Jotham Meeker, a missionary and printer at the Ottawa Baptist Mission near present-day Ottawa, Kansas.

previewthumb

Chronology of the Iowa and Sac and Fox Indians in Doniphan County, Kansas

This chronology details major events occurring between 1837-1855 among the Iowa and Sac and Fox Indians who had been relocated to Kansas after the Indian Removal Act of 1830. Topics mentioned within the chronology include warfare among relocated tribes, the arrival of white emigrants, disease, mission buildings, and treaties ceding land to the United States government.

previewthumb

Rev. Lewis Bodwell

Smith, C.T. ; Topeka, KS

View of Rev. Lewis Bodwell, first pastor of the First Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas.

previewthumb

John Morgan Walden scrapbook

Walden, John Morgan, 1831-1914

J. M. Walden, a Methodist preacher, politician, and ardent Free-State man, was editor of the Quindaro Chindowan newspaper in Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory, from 1857-1858. His two volume scrapbook includes newspaper clippings and notes on national and local politics. It focuses on the Popular Sovereignty issue that defined the creation of Kansas Territory and its efforts to achieve statehood, including many articles on the slavery question generally, abolitionism, the threat of secession, John C. Fremont, and the writing of the Kansas constitution. Many of the articles are from the Quindaro Chindowan.

previewthumb

United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 20, Accounts

United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Central Superintendency

This volume contains records of current accounts from September 21,1822-September 1,1825 for Indian agents, including Lawrence Taliaferro, Banjamin O'Fallon, Richard Graham, James Latham, Nicholas Bolvin, Thomas Forsyth and Pierre Menard. The expenditures of William Clark (of the Lewis and Clark Expedition) are also included as Clark served as Superintendent of Indian Affairs for the Central Superintendency in St. Louis, Missouri. Records were kept for the salaries of the agents and interpreters, transportation costs, gifts, rations, and paid annuities. Partial funding for the digitization of these records was provided by the National Park Service.

previewthumb

United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 25, Accounts

United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Central Superintendency

This volume contains records of current accounts for Osage Indian agents, including Alexander McNair, John F. Hamtramck and Paul L. Chouteau. William Clark (of the Lewis and Clark Expedition) served as Superintendent of Indian Affairs for the Central Superintendency in St. Louis, Missouri. Records were kept for the salaries of the agents, interpreters, and blacksmiths, transportation costs, presents, provisions, and paid annuities. Partial funding for the digitization of these records was provided by the National Park Service.

previewthumb
<< previous| 1 | 2|