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Collections -- Museum (Remove)
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People -- Notable Kansans -- Nation, Carry Amelia,1846-1911 (Remove)
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People -- Notable Kansans (Remove)
Page 1 of 1, showing 7 records out of 7 total, starting on record 1, ending on 7

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Carry Nation poster

F. M. Steves & Sons Printers

Large, rectangular color poster advertising an appearance by Carry Nation, a temperance advocate who gained notoriety by attacking saloons. Her activities began in Medicine Lodge, Kansas, in 1899. A hatchet was her symbol because she often used the tool to smash saloon fixtures. In Nation?s autobiography, The Use and Need of the Life of Carry A. Nation, she explained the genesis of this poster. While jailed in Topeka for smashing saloon fixtures in July 1901, Nation received a letter from James Furlong, manager of the Lyceum Theater in Rochester, New York. According to Nation, Furlong offered to bail her out of jail if she granted him some lecture dates. She agreed, was pardoned, and left almost immediately for a Chautauqua in Clarksburg, Ohio. Her lecture series continued across upstate New York.

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Carry Nation's purse

Carry Nation carried this purse for many public appearances and was photographed with it on several occasions. In her autobiography, entitled The Life of Carry A. Nation, the author refers to a "leather case" that is almost certainly the same bag.

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Carry Nation souvenir pin

This is a gold-plated and mother-of-pearl souvenir hatchet pin has a rhinestone mounted at the center and is pinned to its original paper card. Carry A. Nation, a nationally recognized leader in the Temperance movement, was known to enter alcohol-serving establishments and attack the bars with a hatchet. To raise funds and awareness for her cause, Nation adopted the practice of selling souvenir hatchet pins.

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Carry Nation's dress

Ivory-colored wool dress worn by Carry A. Nation, an internationally recognized leader in the Temperance movement. A resident of Medicine Lodge, Kansas, Nation was known to enter alcohol-serving establishments and attack the bar with a hatchet in order to discourage drinking. Nation was frequently jailed for her acts of vandalism.

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Carry Nation's broadax

William Beatty & Son

This steel broad ax was given to Carry A. Nation, a devout Christian and nationally recognized temperance advocate. Nation, a resident of Medicine Lodge, Kansas, achieved infamy for attacking saloons with a hatchet to discourage drinking and was frequently jailed for vandalism. In January 1901, Nation embarked on a highly publicized trip to Topeka, Kansas, to attend a meeting of the Kansas Temperance Union. During her trip, she assaulted multiple saloons while brandishing axes. According to Robert Scott, an employee of a Kansas Avenue hardware store, Nation entered the store during a raid on a nearby saloon and asked, ?Mr. Scott, have you a hatchet I could use?? Scott provided Nation with this axe. William Beatty and Son, a long-established tool company located in Chester, Pennsylvania, produced the axe.

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Carry Nation souvenir pin

This gold-plated and mother-of-pearl souvenir hatchet pin belonged to Carry A Nation. A resident of Medicine Lodge, Kansas, Nation achieved infamy for attacking saloons with a hatchet to discourage drinking. She was frequently jailed for vandalism. Nation adopted the practice of selling these souvenir hatchet pins to raise funds and awareness for her cause.

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Carry Nation's cane

Carry A. Nation, a nationally recognized temperance advocate, used this unfinished wooden cane. Nation, a resident of Medicine Lodge, Kansas, achieved infamy for attacking saloons with a hatchet to discourage drinking. She was frequently jailed for vandalism. Later in life, Nation donated many items to the Woman?s Christian Temperance Union, including this cane.

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