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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 30 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

John Brown, Jr., correspondence

Brown, John, 1821-1895

John Brown, Jr., wrote these letters to his wife Wealthy Brown during the early years of the Civil War. He enlisted and served as a Captain of Company K, 1st Kansas Cavalry (later the 7th Kansas Cavalry). Colonel Charles Jennison headed this regiment. It appears his wife and son John were living in Ohio, probably Ashtabula. The letters start while Brown is on a recruiting trip in Canada and Michigan. Many of the letters in January 1862 are written from Camp Jackson and Camp Johnson near Morristown, Cass County, Missouri. Brown's letters from February and March 1862 were written from Humboldt, Allen County, Kansas. Brown writes from Camp Wendell Phillips near Lawrence from most of April and May 1862. The last few letters are written from Madison, Indiana, on his way home to Ohio. The letters are very descriptive of camp life and names of many of the men in his company are mentioned. Several letters mention associates of his father's such as William Partridge and Richard Hinton. Almost every letter mentions how much he misses his family. Native American scouts are also mentioned by Brown as valuable to the war effort. Brown discusses the problems of determining local residents' loyalty in the war on the Kansas Missouri border in his letter written January 21, 1862. In the letter dated January 26, 1862, and continued on the 27th, Brown writes that he sent ten black soldiers to save a slave mother and children whose owner was planning to take them further south. In his letter dated March 9, 1862, Brown describes the execution of a soldier named Driscol from Company H who stabbed another soldier, was court martialed, and shot. Brown sent a letter of resignation, because of his continued poor health, to Gen. James Blunt in May 1862. NOTES ABOUT THE IMAGES: Brown frequently made notes in the margins. To make it easier to read these images, the pages with these notes are included twice--first with the original orientation and then again rotated ninety degrees to aid in reading the note. A letter from Hannibal, Missouri, is dated December 7, 1861, but the content of this latter and subsequent letters makes it apparent that this letter was written sometime in January 1862 but before the letter dated January 11, 1862. The images for this letter are placed in the correct order for content but will seem out of order chronologically based on date. The last letter in the group is missing its first page however the content, about primarily family matters, makes it apparent it was written in late 1861 or early 1862. The text version is one file that presents the letters in chronological order, except for the the exceptions noted above. It is necessary to scroll to the appropriate date. SEVERAL PAGES IN VARIOUS LETTERS ARE WRITTEN IN A NUMERIC CODE. This code, between John Brown, Jr. and his wife, encrypt private messages between the couple. A key to the code and transcriptions of those letters can be found filed with the original letters. The code key and transcriptions are available in the repository upon request. Access is restricted to these particular letters; researchers under the age of 18 must be accompanied by a parent or guardian, or provide written permission from same, to see those transcriptions.

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John Stillman Brown to John L. Rupur

Brown, John Stillman, 1806-1902

This letter was written by John Stillman Brown from Lawrence, Kansas, addressed to John L. Rupur. Brown gives a detailed and emotional account of William Quantrill's August 21, 1863, raid on Lawrence. Brown lists individual men and groups such as African Americans and Germans who were killed in the attack. He witnessed much of the violence from a hill above the city, and describes the destruction of life and property. Brown mentions that the town had no warning before the attack and that there was a second panic the following evening when townspeople feared another raid. He also describes how the community's churches came together for a memorial service. A complete transcription is available by clicking "Text Version" below.

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M.R. Brown to William Brown

Brown, Mary Ripley, d. 1878

A letter written from Lawrence, Kansas, by M.R. Brown, addressed to her son, William Brown, who was in college in New York. Brown begins by discussing the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays. She discusses the 300 African Americans who had fled slavery and were now living in Lawrence, and the efforts of an African-American minister in the community. Brown expresses fear that Lawrence would be attacked by Missourians. She also gives news of Leigh R. Webber, a Kansas soldier who often wrote to members of the Brown family.

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Sarah Brown to William Brown

Brown, Sarah

A letter written by Sarah Brown from Lawrence, Kansas, addressed to her brother, William Brown, who was in college in New York. The first part of her letter discusses the presence of the Kansas First in Lawrence. She describes the soldiers as "rough" and notes the proslavery attitude of the regiment, which leads them to abuse African Americans living in Lawrence. Sarah goes on to discuss her views on the need for immediate emancipation. She discusses family issues such as the death of her cousin and a scrapbook she was making with her sister, Mary. The last portion of the letter discusses Sarah's interest in botany and local plants. A complete transcription is available by clicking "Text Version" below.

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George W. Collamore to Honorable William P. Dole

Collamore, Geo. W

A letter written to William P. Dole, Commissioner of Indian Affairs in Washington, D. C., from George W. Collamore in Kansas. Collamore describes the horrible living conditions that the Creek and Cherokee have been living in since the war started, having their homes destroyed, their livestock chased off, and having little food, water, or shelter. Collamore pleads assistance be given. Opothleyahola and his daughter are also mentioned in the letter.

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Rachel Garrison to Samuel L. Adair

Garrison, Rachel A.

Rachel A. Garrison, David Garrison's widow, writes from Yellow Springs, Ohio, with instructions to Samuel L. Adair to settle her family's affairs in Kansas Territory. She wants to try to hold on to her claim. She hopes to sell a wagon for $100 and to collect on a note for $40. Sometimes, she writes, she fells like returning to Kansas, despite her husband's death there. Her late husband, David Garrison, was killed in the Battle of Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, on August 30, 1856.

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Isaac Tichenor Goodnow diary

Goodnow, Isaac T. (Isaac Tichenor), 1814-1894

Diary belonging to Isaac Goodnow, a free-state supporter and the founder of Bluemont College (predecessor to Kansas State University) in Manhattan, Kansas Territory. Although many of the entries are somewhat mundane, dealing with weather, illness, neighbors, etc., others describe political and military activities in Kansas, as well as the land speculation. Goodnow's diary makes mention of the details of his daily life and community activities, such as home maintenance and crop harvests.

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Isaac Tichenor Goodnow diary

Goodnow, Isaac T. (Isaac Tichenor), 1814-1894

Diary belonging to Isaac Goodnow, a free-state supporter and the founder of Bluemont College (predecessor to Kansas State University) in Manhattan, Kansas Territory. Although many of the entries are somewhat mundane, dealing with weather, illness, neighbors, etc., others describe political and military activities in Kansas, as well as the land speculation. Goodnow's diary makes mention of the details of his daily life and community activities, such as home maintenance and crop harvests.

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Isaac Tichenor Goodnow diary

Goodnow, Isaac T. (Isaac Tichenor), 1814-1894

Diary belonging to Isaac Goodnow, a free-state supporter and the founder of Bluemont College (predecessor to Kansas State University) in Manhattan, Kansas Territory. Although many of the entries are somewhat mundane, dealing with weather, illness, neighbors, etc., others describe political and military activities in Kansas, as well as the land speculation. Goodnow's diary makes mention of the details of his daily life and community activities, such as home maintenance and crop harvests.

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Isaac Tichenor Goodnow diary

Goodnow, Isaac T. (Isaac Tichenor), 1814-1894

Diary belonging to Isaac Goodnow, a free-state supporter and the founder of Bluemont College (predecessor to Kansas State University) in Manhattan, Kansas Territory. Although many of the entries are somewhat mundane, dealing with weather, illness, neighbors, etc., others describe political and military activities in Kansas, as well as the land speculation. Goodnow's diary makes mention of the details of his daily life and community activities, such as home maintenance and crop harvests.

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