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Page 1 of 39, showing 10 records out of 384 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

S. L. Adair to the friends of Christ

Adair, Samuel Lyle

This letter reported on the current religious situation in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. According to the author, a missionary with the American Missionary Association, the residents had begun the preliminary steps for organizing a church. In Osawatomie there were a number of Baptists, Congregationalists, and Wesleyans, along with a large group who "make no profession of religion." Adair also wrote about the sickness that prevented more formal organization.

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Samuel L. Adair to S. S. Jocelyn

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

From Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, Samuel Adair writes that his family has been sick, and that others in the area have been ill or died. The bulk of his letter to Reverend Jocelyn deals with elections held by both proslavery and antislavery supporters in October 1855 and the number of Missourians that voted in the proslavery election on October 1. He describes the territorial legislature that met at Shawnee Mission. He indicates that a relative and his son and son-in-law have arrived in Kansas Territory, and that the relative had brought a number of weapons. The relative to whom he referred was probably John Brown, who was a half brother of Adair's wife, Florella. Samuel Adair writes that he is concerned about Brown's war-like attitude and describes a slaveholder who had left the territory because of concern about the "outcome." This appears to be a draft of a letter sent to Jocelyn.

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Samuel L. Adair to Edmund Burke Whitman

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Writing from Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, Adair identifies what relief clothing (coats, socks, etc.) he still has on hand and accounts for cash received and expenses incurred.

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Samuel L. Adair to S. S. Jocelyn

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

This letter was written in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, to Reverend Jocelyn, who was Samuel Adair's contact with the American Missionary Association. The first three pages deal with some disagreement over Adair's salary and support that was to be provided by the association, his efforts on behalf of religion, and prospects for a "union" church building that would be shared by several denominations. The last page discusses economic conditions in Kansas Territory and the difficulty of getting items to Kansas either via the Missouri River or by overland freighting from St. Louis. This appears to be a draft of a letter sent to Jocelyn.

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Samuel L. Adair to Zu Adams

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Samuel Adair, Osawatomie, Kansas, described the two slaves that he had encountered. One was an eight to ten year old boy that had been hired by a merchant from Kansas City. The other slave of which he was aware was a woman owned by an Indian interpreter named Baptiste. This item is from information collected by Miss Zu Adams in 1895. She was researching the topic of slaves in Kansas and contacted a number of early Kansas settlers requesting information about slaves brought to Kansas Territory. While all of the information she collected was based on reminiscences, it still provides useful information that is difficult, if not impossible, to find elsewhere. Miss Adams and her father F. G. Adams were employees of the Kansas State Historical Society and the information received was donated to that institution.

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Samuel L. Adair to S. S. Jocelyn

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

In this draft letter, Samuel Adair writes from Hudson, Ohio, discussing his plans to meet with a "Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Society" party in Chicago. Adair indicates his family consisted of four people and describes the quantity of boxes and luggage they would bring with them. He also writes that he disapproved of traveling on the Sabbath.

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Samuel L. Adair to William F. M. Arny

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Arny was a representative of the National Kansas Committee. In this letter, Adair inquires about various boxes and money that had been sent to the committee in Chicago to forward to people in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. Adair also seems to be responding to a request from Arny for information about settlers from Wisconsin in the Osawatomie area and also members of the Eldridge-Pomeroy party. Adair provides information on James Fuller, Thomas Roberts, Joseph Lawes and William and Wakeman (?) Partridge. He lists the names of four men who came with Eldridge and Pomeroy but provides no additional information about them. He also notes that he loaned Mr. Hyatt $50 and had an "order" for Arny to reimburse him.

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Samuel Lyle Adair to John Brown

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Samuel Adair wrote his brother-in-law John Brown from Osawatomie on October 2, 1857, to explain why he could not come see Brown in Iowa. Much of letter describes the general poor state of health in his locale, but he also comments on the political and especially the prospects for free state success in the upcoming election--Adair was not optimistic.

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Samuel Lyle Adair to John Brown

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

From Osawatomie, Samuel Adair wrote his brother-in-law John Brown regarding monies Adair had received for the "free State men in Kansas" and specifies how these funds were distributed.

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Samuel L. Adair to Mrs. H. L. Hibbard

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Adair, writing from Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, reports on conditions in Kansas to Mrs. Hibbard, who was the president of the Woman's Kansas Aid and Liberty Association of Chicago, Illinois. Adair states that many recent emigrants are ill, and that others, who are using up their own reserves to help the emigrants, hope they will be repaid by aid received in Kansas. He reports that a group of Georgians camped near Osawatomie had run off more than 18 horses. Some free state men had prepared to confront them, but the Georgians had already left the area. Adair writes of rumors that a large force was coming to burn Osawatomie.

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