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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 22 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Daniel Read Anthony correspondence

Anthony, D. R. (Daniel Read), 1824-1904

Daniel Read Anthony letters covering 1858, 1861 and 1862. Daniel was an abolitionist and free stater, and served two terms as mayor of Leavenworth, Kansas. These letters focus on the struggles between the Border Ruffians and the Free State men, military matters, politics, and speaks of freed slaves he has met who want to incite insurrection among other blacks.

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Medical history of the 19th Regiment, Kansas Cavalry Volunteers

Bailey, Mahlon

Mahlon Bailey, the regimental surgeon, recorded this medical history of the 19th Kansas Cavalry. This history includes information on the hasty physicals given to new recruits, wounds received in battle, and other medical problems encountered on the trail, as well as general information about the day-to-day activities of the soldiers. Located at the end of the report is a chart detailing the medical problems of the regiment, including the number of cases of dysentery, gonorrhea, pneumonia, ulcers, burns, and sprains (among many others). At the end of these charts, Bailey expresses his appreciation to the commanders of the regiment, thanking them for following his medical advice and showing concern for the health of their soldiers.

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Governor George Monroe Beebe, annual message

Beebe, George Monroe 1836-1927

George Beebe assumed the title of Acting Governor of Kansas Territory upon the resignation of Samuel Medary. In this printed message from the Executive Office, Kansas Territory (Lecompton) to the territorial legislature, Beebe commented on Medary and other issues relating to Kansas Territory. He included information from the auditor about the amount of taxes that had been collected. He also referenced the pending dissolution of the Union and the "gloom" that brought to all.

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To the Friends of Humanity

Blake, F.N

This circular, written by F. N. Blake and William F. M. Arny, is an appeal for aid to Kansas Territory, with suggestions for specific items and shipping routes for sending food, clothing and other provisions to the settlers starving after the drought of 1860.

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William Brown to Sarah Brown

Brown, William

This letter, written by William Brown from Topeka, Kansas, was addressed to his sister, Sarah Brown, in Lawrence. William and Sarah were children of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. William discussed a Baptist church service in Topeka and the recent Kansas State Fair. The latter part of the letter discusses political issues, including recent elections and fear that the "bushwackers" may attack Leavenworth or Fort Scott.

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Kansas State Seal

Cultural Heritage and Arts Center

The State Seal of Kansas. The Seal of Kansas and the state motto, Ad astra per aspera (to the stars through difficulties), were adopted through a joint resolution during the first Kansas legislative session on May 25, 1861.

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General J. Lane's house, Lawrence, Kansas. 323 miles west of St. Louis, Mo.

Gardner, Alexander, 1821-1882

THis stereograph showing James Henry Lane's house, Lawrence, Kansas. The Kansas River and the town of Lawrence are visible in the background. It is from Alexander Gardner's series, Across the Continent on the Union Pacific Railway, Eastern Division.

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S. P. Hartz to Samuel N. Wood

Hartz, S. P.

S. P. Hartz, a medical doctor, wrote to Samuel N. Wood from Allen, Breckinridge (now Lyon) County, Kansas Territory, regarding the Woods' "sick son," but devoted most of his two page letter to a legislative issue--the proposal to make Allen the county seat of a new county.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from La Porte, Indiana to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Topeka, Kansas Territory. On his way to Washington, D. C. he planned to collect a debt. A friend had given him railway passes to Pittsburgh. The contrast between the quality of life in the northern states and Kansas Territory saddened Cyrus, who quoted a verse. He gave instructions to Mary concerning the livestock and farmland. In a postscript, he emphasized that she save the eyes of potatoes.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote to Mary from Chicago, Illinois, one stop along his journey to Washington, D. C. where he would lobby Congress for assistance with the Atchison and Topeka Railroad. He gave details of his journey and mentioned several people he had or planned to visit en route to Washington. Kansas Territory was suffering an especially severe winter.

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