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Page 1 of 6, showing 10 records out of 52 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Milton M. Powers to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Milton M. Powers, Deputy Clerk of Court in Columbus, Ohio wrote to Cyrus K. Holliday, Free State leader and founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory. Powers had read of Holliday's activities in northern newspapers. A presentation of the Wrongs of Kansas, emphasizing Andrew H. Reeder and Samuel N. Wood's experiences, had emotionally motivated Powers to write and assure Holliday of his support. Once a Jeffersonian Democrat, but convicted that the party had abandoned its principles, Powers had become a Republican. He stated that the entire nation was attuned to events in Kansas Territory, and he believed that these events would have intense impact on the nation's future.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, who, accompanied by Mrs. Edward C. K. Garvey, had returned to Meadville, Pennsylvania to give birth to her second child. Meanwhile, Cyrus Holliday (who was Vice President of the upper territorial legislative body, the Council) had passed four bills, including one establishing Topeka as the Shawnee county seat. He bought new clothes for the session, since Lawrence had become more refined, with a new hotel. Holliday mentioned emigration to Pikes Peak, the Topeka bridge, trouble in L[i]nn county, and meeting three women, Mrs. Smith, Mrs. [Robert] Morrow, and Mrs. O'Donell (possibly Mrs. William O'Donnall) in Lawrence. He proposed that Liz, Mary Holliday's younger sister, return with her.

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Willliam B. Shockley affidavit

Shockley, William B.

William B. Shockley, Clerk of the District Court at Cherokee County, testifies before Henry G. Sumner, Justice of the Peace of Cherokee County, concerning an armed band of men opposing the operation of a land office at Baxter Springs (Cherokee County). The band of two hundred and twelve armed men identified themselves as the Cherokee Neutral Land League. The League arrested or threatened persons associated with the land office and raided the office to steal its plat maps and land entries. The League was composed of many settlers of the Cherokee Neutral Lands, which lands were open for sale in 1866 by treaty with the Cherokee. The League's actions were an attempt to stop the construction of a railroad by the Missouri River, Fort Scott & Gulf Railroad whose recent purchase of the lands many considered illegal. James F. Joy represented the railroad. In May 1869, Governor James Harvey appealed for federal troops to help control settler violence.

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James Blackwood Pearson

This black and white photograph shows James Blackwood Pearson, (1920-2009). A World War II veteran and lawyer from Prairie Village he served as assistant county attorney of Johnson County, Kansas from 1952-1954 and as a Kansas Senator from 1956-1960. Pearson was appointed, on January 31, 1962, to the U.S. Senate to fill the vacancy left by the death of Andrew F. Schoeppel. In a special election in November of 1967, he was re-elected and served in the Senate until 1978.

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Charles Curtis, Vice President of the United States

Portrait of Charles Curtis, 1860-1936, United States Congressman, 1893-1907, U. S. Senator, 1907-1913 and 1915-1929, and Vice President of the United States, 1929-1933.

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James Blackwood Pearson

This black and white photograph shows James Blackwood Pearson, (1920-2009). A World War II veteran and lawyer from Prairie Village he served as assistant county attorney of Johnson County, Kansas, from 1952-1954, and as a Kansas Senator from 1956-1960. Pearson was appointed, on January 31, 1962, to the U.S. Senate to fill the vacancy left by the death of Andrew F. Schoeppel. In a special election in November of 1967, he was re-elected and served in the U. S. Senate until 1978.

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Governor Payne Harry Ratner

This portrait represents Payne Harry Ratner. Ratner was the first resident of Labette County to be elected as County Attorney, holding office from 1923 to 1927. After serving as County Attorney, he went on to serve in the Kansas State Senate from 1929 to 1939, and then later served two terms as Kansas Governor from 1939 to 1943. Notable programs during his administration was implementing a teachers? pension plan and a state employee merit system.

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James Blackwood Pearson

This black and white photograph shows James Blackwood Pearson, (1920-2011). A World War II veteran and lawyer from Prairie Village he served as assistant county attorney of Johnson County, Kansas, from 1952-1954 and a Kansas Senator from 1956-1960. Pearson was appointed, on January 31, 1962, to the U.S. Senate to fill the vacancy left by the death of Andrew F. Schoeppel. In a special election in November of 1967, he was re-elected and served in the Senate until 1978.

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Kansas road and bridge funds

This Kansas Good Roads Association pamphlet argues that Kansas should invest more in road and bridge construction and maintenance. The card provides one in a series of eleven talks. An illustration demonstrates the difficulties poor roads cause for farmers. Frank Smith is the general manager in Topeka, Kansas.

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G. B. Woodford to Governor John Martin

Woodward, C.B.

In this letter, the local authorities of Labette County, Kansas, plead with Kansas governor John Martin for militia support to preserve order in Parsons during the railroad strike of 1886. In February 1885, railroad shop workers walked off the job because of a cut in pay and reduced hours of work. Governor Martin was able to negotiate a settlement to the strike but problems continued throughout Kansas, Missouri, and Texas.

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