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Page 1 of 5, showing 10 records out of 48 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday, soon to return to Topeka after a productive territorial legislative session in Lawrence, wrote to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. He wrote about a festival held at the Eldridge House, and reported on several other incidents of note: the arrest of John W. Doy, captured by Missourians while helping former slaves travel to Iowa; John Brown's avoidance of capture by [John P.] Woods (at the Battle of the Spurs on January 31, 1859); and Charles Fischer's escape after being twice arrested as "a fugitive slave." Holliday also wrote that the legislature had passed and Governor Samuel Medary would approve a bill granting Josephine Branscomb a divorce. Despite Holliday's efforts, the constitutional convention would be held at Wyandotte in July. He had refused [Alfred L.] Winans' request for a recommendation.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Having long wished to be joined in Topeka, Kansas Territory by his wife, Mary Holliday, and daughter, Lillie, Cyrus K. Holliday instructed them not to leave Meadville, Pennsylvania, until he wrote again. Alarmed by recent killings, arrests, and home evictions of free state men, Cyrus, usually optimistic, foresaw continued unrest. He also mentioned receiving money Mary had sent. In a post script, he emphasized that their journey was necessarily, though undesirably, delayed.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

During a lull, Cyrus K. Holliday reported from Topeka, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania that Colonel Edwin V. Sumner had forced proslavery troops back to Missouri and camped on the border. Two free state men from Wisconsin had killed proslavery supporters near Osawatomie. Governor Wilson Shannon had resigned. A "large mass convention" was planned for July 2nd and 3rd, with a meeting of the free state legislature on the 4th. Cyrus advised Mary and Mr. Nichols to wait until after the 4th to travel to the territory.

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E. P. Lamborn correspondence and research papers

Lamborn, E. P. (Edward Parker), 1890-1978

This collection reflects E. P. Lamborn's life long interest in crime, criminals and law officers. E. P. Lamborn was an amateur historian and collector of sources on crime and criminals of the Middle West in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. His interests ranged from bandits, peace officers, famous detectives, and buffalo hunters. The Correspondence and Research section, presented here, contains much information on these topics from friends, relatives, companies, law officers, etc., who had some connection or dealings with these individuals. The arrangement for this section, generally, is alphabetical by last name of the correspondent. A detailed, searchable calendar of correspondents is available by clicking on "Text Version" below or by accessing the full collection finding aid in the link below. A transcription of this correspondence is not yet available. This series comprises boxes 2 and 3 of the E. P. Lamborn collection. You can find individual items in the order they are described in the "calendar of correspondents" by using the page selection feature available when you are looking at a full sized page image.

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Edmund Jones to Hiram Hill

Jones, Edmund

Edmund Jones wrote briefly from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Hiram Hill in Williamsburgh, Massachusetts. He referred to the security of town lots and a previously sent newspaper. Mr. Fuller, a delinquent renter, was "selling liquor" in Hill's house. Jones suggested that Hill come soon.

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Edward J. Masterson

A formal portrait of Dodge City, Kansas, marshall Edward J. Masterson (1852-1878), older brother of William Barclay "Bat" Masterson. Marshall Ed Masterson was killed in a gunfight on April 9, 1878, in Dodge City from a chest wound he received while attempting to disarm drunken cowboy, Jack Wagner.

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Fort Dodge Soldiers' Home - Discharge of Chief Engineer

Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)

This file includes general correspondence relating to the discharge of the Chief Engineer and Fort Dodge Soldiers' Home. Topics included, but not limited to, in the file is possible rioting by inmates if Nelson Larson is removed as Chief Engineer, newspaper clippings discussing Governor Capper's interference in Larson's discharge, and management of employees at Fort Dodge Soldiers' Home. This is part of a bigger collection of Governor Arthur Capper correspondence.

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George Washington Brown to Eli Thayer

Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915

George Washington Brown, editor of the Herald of Freedom newspaper, was one of seven free state leaders arrested on May 14, 1856 on charges of high treason and held prisoner by federal troops near Lecompton. G. W. Brown described the sack of Lawrence and the destruction of his printing press, commented upon the harshness of his prison conditions, and asked Eli Thayer to do anything in his power to help secure his release.

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Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, Kansas State Industrial Reformatory applications

Kansas. Governor (1929-1931 : Reed)

This file includes subject correspondence relating to applications of employment with the Kansas State Industrial Reformatory, currently known as the Hutchinson Correctional Facitlity in Hutchinson, Kansas. This file is part of a bigger collection of Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence.

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Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, State Penitentiary applications

Kansas. Governor (1929-1931 : Reed)

This file includes subject correspondence relating to applications of employment with the State Penitentiary. This file is part of a bigger collection of Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence.

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