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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 26 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Abandonment of Mattie Marion by Husband

Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)

This file includes general correspondence relating to the abandonment of Mattie Marion by her husband. Topics included, but not limited to, in the correspondence is Mattie Marion being abandoned by her husband after moving to Missouri for him to return to Kansas, procedures to take her husband to court in Kinsley to support her and their child, and the role of the County and General Attorney and Governor in domestic cases. This is part of a bigger collection of Governor Arthur Capper correspondence.

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Action of Other Cities on the 'Exodus' Question

Wyandotte Gazette

This article includes information about Exoduster relief efforts in both Topeka and Lawrence. In Topeka, the Kansas Freedmen?s Aid Association had appealed to other counties, asking them to form local aid societies to assist refugees in their respective areas. Lawrence citizens held a meeting in Fraser Hall to discuss the Exodus; the attendees recognized the legitimacy of the Exodus and were willing to provide aid and support for the emigrants.

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Albert C. Morton to Hiram Hill

Morton, Albert C.

Albert Morton wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, describing at length the efforts of Quindaro's citizens to grade a large avenue through the town. Morton added that Quindaro was about to establish a city charter, which, if approved by the Legislature, would require the taxation of the citizens. He also mentioned a shooting the night before of a proslavery man who had lost his seat to free statesman Charles Chadwick in a recent election under the Lecompton Constitution.

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Barclay's Business Directory of Leavenworth for 1859

Pierse, Allen

In addition to a listing of businesses and advertisements, the directory included the elected officials for the city of Leavenworth for 1858-59 and the newspapers published in Leavenworth. A few women are listed as owners of businesses. The information for the directory was compiled by Allen Pierse.

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C. E. Blood to Hiram Hill

Blood, C.E.

C. E. Blood wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts. Blood informed Hill of an upcoming meeting of the Manhattan Town Association, and told him that he should send a power of attorney to a local citizen to act as his representative. Blood also said that he had not received money for the city tax he had previously requested, and warned Hill that the city authorities would sell his lots if they were not paid.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

A formal portrait of Cyrus Kurtz Holliday (1826-1900), of Topeka, Kansas. Holliday came to Kansas Territory in 1854 from Meadville, Pennsylvania. He was an agent for the New England Emigrant Aid Company, one of the founders of Topeka, and was the first president of the Topeka Town Association. He was very active in territorial political activities, including the Topeka movement, he was a delegate to the Topeka Constitutional Convention, and served in the Kansas State Senate in 1861. Holliday was also the first president of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway, and served as one of the railroad's directors for nearly 40 years.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from the Wyandotte Convention to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. His efforts to ensure that Topeka would be the capital of Kansas Territory had set back his personal political career (territorially and nationally, that is; he had recently been elected mayor of Topeka). Cyrus anxiously awaited the return of Mary and their children, Lillie and newborn Charles.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, who, accompanied by Mrs. Edward C. K. Garvey, had returned to Meadville, Pennsylvania to give birth to her second child. Meanwhile, Cyrus Holliday (who was Vice President of the upper territorial legislative body, the Council) had passed four bills, including one establishing Topeka as the Shawnee county seat. He bought new clothes for the session, since Lawrence had become more refined, with a new hotel. Holliday mentioned emigration to Pikes Peak, the Topeka bridge, trouble in L[i]nn county, and meeting three women, Mrs. Smith, Mrs. [Robert] Morrow, and Mrs. O'Donell (possibly Mrs. William O'Donnall) in Lawrence. He proposed that Liz, Mary Holliday's younger sister, return with her.

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Cyrus Leland, Jr.

This photo shows Cyrus Leland, Jr. (b. 1841, d. 1917) holding a string of fish and a fishing pole. He was born in Sauk County, Wisconsin, and came to Kansas in 1858. He served as a lieutenant with Company F of the Tenth Kansas Infantry. He was a member of the Kansas legislature in 1865-1866 and again in 1903-1907. Beginning in 1866, he operated a store in Troy and served many years as county commissioner and as a member of the Republican National Committee. He was appointed by President Benjamin Harrison to be collector of internal revenue for Kansas, Oklahoma, and the Indian Territory for 1889-1893. Leland was named Missouri Valley pension agent by President William McKinley, a position he held from 1897 until 1901. Leland was a dominant force in Kansas politics and government. He died in a St. Joseph, Missouri, hospital.

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Cyrus Leland, Jr., and family

This is a photo of Cyrus Leland, Jr. with his family. Front Row (left to right): Mildred Finley, daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Harry Finley; Martha Leland Willcockson, Cyrus' sister; Florence Leland Douglas. Middle Row (left to right): Mildred Leland Finley; Judy Leland Hayden; Cyrus Leland Finley, son of Mr. & Mrs. Harry Finley; Cyrus Leland, Jr.; Fannie Leland Finley; Back row (left to right): Mildred Finley's husband Harry (was Clerk of the U.S. District Court for the District of Oklahoma); Bill Leland (killed in WW I in France); C. V. Norman, husband of Sadie Leland Norman (died in 1897); Florence Evelyn Townsley Leland; Edwin Sherman Leland; G. C. Finley, husband of Fannie Leland Finley. Cyrus Leland, Jr., (1841-1917, was born in Sauk County, Wisconsin and came to Kansas in 1858. He served as a lieutenant with Company F of the Tenth Kansas Infantry. He was a member of the Kansas legislature in 1865-66 and again in 1903-1907. Beginning in 1866, he operated a store in Troy, Kansas, and served many years as county commissioner and as a member of the Republican national committee. Appointed by President Benjamin Harrison to be collector of internal revenue for Kansas, Oklahoma and the Indian Territory, 1889-1893, Leland was named Missouri Valley pension agent by president William McKinley, a position he held from 1897 until 1901. He was a dominant force in Kansas politics and government, at both the state and national levels. He died in a St. Joseph, Missouri, hospital.

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