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Community Life -- Clubs and organizations -- Charitable (Remove)
Page 2 of 3, showing 10 records out of 25 total, starting on record 11, ending on 20

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

S.T. Shore, testimony

This testimony, a portion of the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, was collected by the National Kansas Committee under the leadership of Thaddeus Hyatt. Although Captain Shore was a free state militia captain and was active during the border warfare of 1856, this account focuses on his personal life and his perceptions of the Kansas Territory rather than upon his political or military experiences. The testimony begins with general information about his family, claim, etc., and then proceeds to his personal opinion of the land and vegetation in Kansas.

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W. F. M. Arny to Thaddeus Hyatt

Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881

W.F.M. Arny, agent of the National Kansas Committee, continues to send Thaddeus Hyatt, president of this committee, copies of letters he had received from Kansas settlers. These letters describe the economic conditions resulting from the continued drought during 1860. The reports were submitted by Rev. J. W. Fox of Ridgeway, Kansas Territory; the "Committee on the Little Osage" of Bourbon County, Kansas Territory; Dr. I. W. Robinson of Manhattan, Kansas Territory; and Joseph M. Todd and others of Greenwood Township in Greenwood County, Kansas Territory.

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Letters from Thaddeus Hyatt. The Drouth in Kansas universal! The last crop gone! No buckwheat! No vegetables! No corn! No seed of any kind! No bread! No money! No Hope! What is to be done? (No. 3)

Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, writes to the "New York Tribune" to make New Englanders aware of the destitution and suffering of settlers in Kansas Territory. Hyatt gives accounts of conditions in Americus and Emporia townships in Breckenridge County and also in Jackson County and Lawrence. The letter reports the condition of crops, cattle disease, etc. It contains similar information to other statements made by Kansas settlers during the drought of 1860.

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S.H. Moore, reminiscences

Hyatt, Thaddeus

This testimony made up a portion of the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, a collection of personal reminiscences that was apparently recorded by Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. This particular account relates the experience of S. H. Moore, a resident of Ottawa, Kansas Territory. Mr. Moore describes the land, vegetation, etc. around Ottawa and mentions various settlers from the area.

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Henry and Clara Smith to John P. St. John

Smith, Henry and Clara

Henry Smith and his daughter, Clara, wrote this letter to Kansas Governor John St. John requesting information about black emigration to Kansas. Smith wrote on behalf of his community in Marshall, Texas, saying that a number of people were hoping to emigrate because they were unable to make a living due to discriminatory practices. According to the letter, some of the Smith's white neighbors were threatening to follow black emigrants if they attempted to leave the area (to what end is unclear). In addition to his role as Kansas governor, St. John served on the Board of Directors of the Kansas Freedmen's Relief Association.

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Thaddeus Hyatt to Amos Adams Lawrence

Hyatt, Thaddeus

This letter was written from New York by the president of the National Kansas Committee, Thaddeus Hyatt. He was writing to Amos Lawrence about the committee's efforts to relieve the suffering of free state settlers in Kansas Territory. Apparently, a shipment of clothing to Kansas contained a number of articles that were well worn and of little use. Hyatt also spoke of the need for agricultural implements, cattle, and seeds to end the suffering of the settlers.

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New England Kansas Relief Committee notices

Collamore, Geo. W

These two written notices informed the recipient that their seed corn and potatoes were distributed by the New England Kansas Relief Committee. It also instructed the people to use the corn and potatoes wisely and to report harvest yield to the distribution agent. The notices were signed by George Collamore, agent for this committee.

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Edmund Burke Whitman to National Kansas Committee, expense sheet

Whitman, E. B. (Edmund Burke), 1812-1883

This expense sheet, which was in account with E. B. Whitman, an agent of the committee, lists expenses and supplies sent to aid the free state inhabitants of Kansas. The items sent include (among others) wheat, oats, corn, beans, potatoes, garden seeds, bedding, and clothing.

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Drought reports, Kansas Territory

This document contains additional reports of conditions in various Kansas Territory counties during the drought of 1860. It consists of letters that W. F. M. Arny copied and sent to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. The reports were submitted by Josiah G. Fuller, James Whary, and Henry Brock, Eureka, Greenwood County; W. A. Harris and A. L Williams, Cottonwood Falls, Chase County; H. H. George, W. Wendell, and R. W. Cloud, Waterloo, Breckenridge County; I. P. Herrick, Iowa Township, Doniphan County; G. S. Northrup, J. H. Spicey, and A. G. Carpenter, Geneva Township, Allen County; and Charles P. Twiss, Cofachique Township, Allen County. The reports describe prospects for crops and other conditions resulting from the prolonged drought.

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Roseline Cunningham to John P. St. John

Cunningham, Roseline

Roseline Cunningham, a black schoolteacher from Westpoint, Mississippi, wrote this letter to Kansas governor John St. John concerning emigration to Kansas. Cunningham, like many other Exodusters, was unable to make a living in the South and sought information about settling in Kansas. She also wanted to know if there was a governmental agency or society that would help her (and her neighbors) cover the cost of emigration. Governor St. John served on the board of the Kansas Freedmen?s Relief Association.

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