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Page 2 of 2, showing 8 records out of 18 total, starting on record 11, ending on 18

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Wilson Shannon

Doney, Thomas

Portrait of Wilson Shannon, Territorial Governor of Kansas, commissioned August 10, 1855, took the oath September 7, 1855, served June 24, 1856, July 7 to August 18, 1856, and sworn in a second time June 13, 1856.

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Benjamin Stringfellow

Portrait of Benjamin Stringfellow, attorney and pro-slavery activist. In 1838, Stringfellow settled in Missouri, where he served in the house of representatives, and was attorney general for four years. After moving to Weston, Missouri, he became a member and officer of the Platte County Self-Defensive Association (an aggressive pro-slavery organization). He wrote a pamphlet entitled "Negro Slavery No Evil, or the North and the South." In 1858, Stringfellow moved to Atchison, Kansas Territory, where he helped build the town and was an attorney for the Kansas City, St. Joseph & Council Bluffs Railroad.

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Knox & Kellogg to James B. Abbott

St. Louis attorneys Knox & Kellogg responded to an inquiry from James Abbott, informing him that they had been in communication with M. F. Conway, by request of Samuel Cabot. Knox & Kellogg told Abbott that, once received, they would hold the rifles subject to Cabot's order. The attorneys stated they had done all they could since they had not heard further word from Cabot nor could they predict when they themselves would receive the rifle shipment. Cabot had made several attempts to recover rifles that were stolen from him by Missouri "Highwaymen" in the spring of 1857.

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John A. Halderman

John Halderman grew up in Kentucky and was trained as a lawyer. He came to Kansas Territory in 1854 and served as the personal secretary to the first territorial governor Andrew Reeder. In 1855, he served as secretary to the first territorial council. He ultimately separated himself from the pro-slavery Lecompton movement. He was the first probate judge of Leavenworth County. He served as a major of the First Kansas volunteers during the Civil War and lived most of the rest of his life in Leavenworth.

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William Weer, Brief for Applicant

Weer, William

William Weer served as legal counsel for the Wyandotte Reserve and presented this brief on behalf of William Lykins and Robert Robitaille apparently to the Commissioner of the Land Office at Lecompton, Kansas Territory. Lykins and Robitaille were attempting to receive a patent for land that was also claimed by the Lawrence Association, Gaius Jenkins, Charles Robinson, S. J. Livingston, George G. Mathews, and William Savage. The brief contained a short history of the Wyandot tribes removal west and various treaties involving land. The claim involved parts of the city of Lawrence. The brief cited various cases and laws upon which Mr. Weer based his arguments.

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Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown

Webber, L. R.

A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from "Steamer Robert Campbell Jr. near Liberty Mo.," is addressed to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence, Kansas. Webber describes how his fellow troops have become more experienced soldiers "who fight for liberty and law." He discusses the march from Fort Riley to Fort Leavenworth and conditions on the boat that was taking them further south. He also mentiones William Brown's new law position with former Kansas Territory governor Wilson Shannon.

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Thomas Ewing, Jr.

Brady's National Portrait Galleries

This carte-de-visite shows Thomas Ewing, Jr., (1829-1896). A native of Ohio he migrated to the Kansas Territory in 1856 to practice law in Leavenworth, Kansas. As a supporter of the free state party Ewing became a delegate in 1858 to the Leavenworth Constitutional Convention. In 1861 he was appointed as the state of Kansas' first chief justice of the supreme court. With the outbreak of the Civil War Ewing enlisted in the Union army and became colonel of the Eleventh Kansas infantry regiment. He rose through the ranks to brigadier general and to breveted major general before mustering out of service in 1865. After the war Ewing became active in the Greenback wing of the Democrat party and served in the United States house of representatives from the state of Ohio. On January 21,1896 Ewing passed away at the age of sixty-seven from injuries received in a street car accident in New York City.

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Robert Byington Mitchell

Nichols, A. C.

Robert B. Mitchell settled in Paris, Linn County, Kansas Territory, in 1856. He was born in Ohio and studied law. He was active in free state territorial politics. He served in the Territorial House of Representatives in 1857 and 1858, was a member of the Leavenworth Constitutional Convention, and was appointed Territorial Treasurer on February 11, 1859. He was part of the free state supporters who followed Charles Hamilton and his band after the Marais des Cygnes massacre. After the territorial period he served as a brigadier general in the Second Kansas Volunteer Cavalry and held the appointed post of Governor of New Mexico from 1866 to 1869.

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