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Page 2 of 5, showing 10 records out of 44 total, starting on record 11, ending on 20

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

William Henry Avery

A photograph of Governor William Henry Avery speaking to a young woman who was crowned queen at the Kansas State Fair. Avery was born August 11, 1911 near Wakefield, Kansas, and graduated from Wakefield High School and the University of Kansas. In 1964, Avery was elected the 37th governor of Kansas. He served one term as governor, losing a re-election bid to Robert Docking in 1966.

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Programme of the Quarter-Centennial Celebration of the Settlement of Kansas at Bismarck Grove, Lawrence, on the Kansas Pacific Railway

This broadside lists the various events that were planed for the 25th anniversary celebration of the opening of Kansas Territory to settlement. The events were held at Bismark Grove near Lawrence, Douglas County, Kansas. Church services were held on Sunday, September 14. Other activities included a Quarter-Centennial Salute by 25 guns at sunrise on Monday, Sept. 15, various musical entertainment; remarks by numerous early antislavery settlers in Kansas and current U.S. Senators and the Governor of Kansas J.P. St. John; an address by Eli Thayer of Worcester, Massachusetts, who was a supporter of the New England Emigrant Aid Company; a "Grand Barbecue Dinner" and a "Grand Farewell Sociable" followed by fireworks. This poster also includes advertisments from numerous Lawrence businesses.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday, the founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. He told her of his planned trip up the Kansas River, his pleasure in the people of Kansas Territory, and a Thanksgiving dinner he attended. Unwilling to return to Pennsylvania, Holliday expressed desire that Mary come to Kansas Territory and described the construction of a friend's sod-covered "mansion," one such as Clarina I. H. Nichols, a lecturer and writer, inhabited.

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Dr. John R. Brinkley at a political rally

This black and white photograph shows Dr. John R. Brinkley, a physician from Milford, Kansas, standing beside an airplane with two unidentified men. Brinkley became famous for his controversial goat gland transplants and unconventional medical practice. He ran as an independent write-in candidate for governor of Kansas in 1930, 1932 and 1934.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday, soon to return to Topeka after a productive territorial legislative session in Lawrence, wrote to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. He wrote about a festival held at the Eldridge House, and reported on several other incidents of note: the arrest of John W. Doy, captured by Missourians while helping former slaves travel to Iowa; John Brown's avoidance of capture by [John P.] Woods (at the Battle of the Spurs on January 31, 1859); and Charles Fischer's escape after being twice arrested as "a fugitive slave." Holliday also wrote that the legislature had passed and Governor Samuel Medary would approve a bill granting Josephine Branscomb a divorce. Despite Holliday's efforts, the constitutional convention would be held at Wyandotte in July. He had refused [Alfred L.] Winans' request for a recommendation.

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75,000 Legionnaires capture New York

Illustrated Current News, Inc.

These are picturegrams from the American Legion Convention in New York in 1952. "As some 3 million New Yorkers cheer their lagging footsteps, the delegates to the American Legion Convention, West Point Cadets, many bands, etc., parade on Fifth Ave. for 9 1/2 hours." 1. A zany 'Leapin Lena' gives the crowd a lot of laughs. 2. Presidential candidate Dwight D. Eisenhower, and Harry W. Colmery, march with the Kansas delegation. 3. Claude Buzich, Minneapolis, gives a reluctant policeman a great big kiss.

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William Brown to Sarah Brown

Brown, William

This letter, written by William Brown from Topeka, Kansas, was addressed to his sister, Sarah Brown, in Lawrence. William and Sarah were children of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. William discussed a Baptist church service in Topeka and the recent Kansas State Fair. The latter part of the letter discusses political issues, including recent elections and fear that the "bushwackers" may attack Leavenworth or Fort Scott.

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William Henry Avery

A photograph of Governor William Henry Avery placing a crown on a young woman at the Kansas State Fair. Avery was born August 11, 1911 near Wakefield, Kansas, and graduated from Wakefield High School and the University of Kansas. A Republican, Avery served in the Kansas House of Representatives from 1950 to 1955. In 1954, he was elected to the United States House of Representatives and served until 1964. During his 10 years in Congress, he served on numerous committees. In 1964, Avery was elected the 37th governor of Kansas. He served one term as governor, losing a re-election bid to Robert Docking in 1966. After an unsuccessful bid for the United States Senate, Avery returned to private life.

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Mary Dillon Holliday to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Holliday, Mary Dillon, 1833-1908

Mary Holliday wrote from Meadville, Pennsylvania to her husband, Cyrus K. Holliday at Topeka, Kansas Territory. A thoughtful review of the previous year, her letter gave thanks for protection from harm despite sorrows and calamities. Using Biblical allusions and paraphrases, she joyfully expressed hope that eternal bliss begins with a well lived life, and encouraged her husband to consider misspent time and to carry out good New Year's resolutions.

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William Henry Avery campaigning, Clay Center, Kansas

A photograph of Governor William Henry Avery riding in a convertible car with campaign signs on the door in Clay Center, Kansas. He was possibly participating in the Piotique Festival parade which began in 1936 to celebrate the opening of Highway 24 west of Clay Center. Avery was born August 11, 1911 near Wakefield, Kansas, and graduated from Wakefield High School and the University of Kansas. In 1964, Avery was elected the 37th governor of Kansas. He served one term as governor, losing a re-election bid to Robert Docking in 1966.

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