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Page 2 of 401, showing 10 records out of 4002 total, starting on record 11, ending on 20

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Frank's Pharmacy, Valley Falls, Kansas

A photograph of John Carlin, former Governor of Kansas, and Frank Shrimplin, inside Frank's Pharmacy standing in front of a "History of Pharmacy" display. Frank Shrimplin owned the pharmacy at 324 Broadway. The photograph is signed by John Carlin.

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License plate

Rectangular aluminum license plate issued for trucks in Kansas. Includes wheat graphics. This plate was used on a 1955 Ford grain truck owned by the Geffert Family of Allen County. The truck was used to haul corn, milo, soybeans, and wheat, and is now in the collections of the Society.

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United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 24, Accounts

United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Central Superintendency

This volume contains the accounts of Thomas Forsyth (1822-1830), Felix St. Vrain (1830-1831), Joshua Pilcher (1832), and M.S. Davenport (1832-1834), Indian agents for the Sac and Fox at the Rock Island, Illinois sub-agency. During this time, the accounts were recorded by William Clark (of the Lewis and Clark Expedition) who was the Superintendent of Indian Affairs at the Central Superintendency in St. Louis, Missouri. Some of the expenditures included salaries for interpreters, blacksmiths, and agents, transportation costs, blankets, tobacco, whiskey, flour, and salt. Partial funding for the digitization of these records was provided by the National Park Service.

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Fern Gayden

This is a photograph of Fern Gayden possibly taken in Dunlap, Kansas. Fern Gayden was born September 29, 1904, in Dunlap, Kansas, where she attended elementary and secondary schools. She went on to attend Kansas State Teachers College at Emporia and taught school for one year. Fern Gayden moved to Chicago at the age of 23. She had a 50-year career as a social worker but became best known as a literary, fine arts, and political activist. A founding member of the South Side Writers Group in the 1930s, Fern Gayden's long and diverse career included leadership roles in the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom and the South Side Community Art Center. During World War II, she co-published Negro Story magazine with Alice Browning.

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Lone Pine

Coy Avon Seward

Black and white intaglio print on paper, depicting a single pine tree in a rocky terrain. The artist was Coy Avon Seward (1884-1939), born in Chase, Kansas, and trained at both Washburn and Bethany colleges. Seward was a founding member of the Prairie Print Makers Association. This group believed art should be affordable for all people. Seward inscribed this print to the donor, Virginia McArthur of Hutchinson, who saw Seward produce the print in 1934.

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Menninger staff meeting, Topeka, Kansas

Seven staff members are shown in a team meeting discussing ways to diagnose and treat patients in the Menninger Clinic. This clinic was created to care for individuals with mood, personality, anxiety and addictive disorders, as well as teaching mental health professionals and advancing mental healthcare through research.

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United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 25, Accounts

United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Central Superintendency

This volume contains records of current accounts for Osage Indian agents, including Alexander McNair, John F. Hamtramck and Paul L. Chouteau. William Clark (of the Lewis and Clark Expedition) served as Superintendent of Indian Affairs for the Central Superintendency in St. Louis, Missouri. Records were kept for the salaries of the agents, interpreters, and blacksmiths, transportation costs, presents, provisions, and paid annuities. Partial funding for the digitization of these records was provided by the National Park Service.

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Charles Arbuckle to Lewis Allen Alderson

These four letters are from Charles Arbuckle to Lewis Allen Alderson. Arbuckle writes from Alderson's hometown of Lewisburg, West Virginia. In the letters, Arbuckle encourages Alderson to propose to Miss Lucy B. Miles, whom Alderson marries the day after he graduates from the University of Ohio in 1832. Arbuckle states that "an amiable woman next to religion is man's greatest consolation" but he seeks to remain a bachelor himself. Arbuckle also attended the Staunton Convention leading up to the election of 1832. Alderson later moved to Atchison, Kansas, in 1858 and was a prominent Baptist minister. He died in Atchison in 1881.

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Theodosius Botkin

Downing, George

This portrait of Theodosius Botkin was taken in Topeka, Kansas, when he served in the legislature. He came to Kansas in 1865 and settled in Linn County. He taught school and was later principal at Pleasanton for four years. In 1875, he located to Mound City and was admitted to the bar. Botkin served as probate judge in Linn County and police judge of Mound City. In March 1889, Governor Humphrey appointed him judge of the Thirty-second District in Stevens County. It was in his court that Samuel N. Wood was assassinated in June, 1891. Impeachment proceedings were brought against Botkin, but he was acquitted on all charges. Botkin resigned the judgeship on October 11, 1892 and he moved to Hutchinson, Kansas. In 1896 he was elected to the Kansas House of Representatives from Reno County. A year later he was named commander of the Grand Army, Department of Kansas. In 1901 he settled in Salt Lake, Utah where he practiced law. Botkin died May 27, 1918 in Salt Lake.

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Joan of Arc of the coal fields, near Pittsburg, Kansas

New York Times

This newspaper clipping, from the New York Times, features a fourteen year old girl dubbed "The Joan of Arc of the Coal Fields." The daughter of a coal striker in southeast Kansas, she carried the American flag at the head of 6,000 marchers. The group of protesters marched through the coal fields showing their support for better wages and improved working conditions for their family members who worked in the camps.

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