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Page 2 of 138, showing 10 records out of 1372 total, starting on record 11, ending on 20

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Samuel Lyle Adair's diary, 1854-1861

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

This diary, written by Samuel Lyle Adair, during the seven year period from 1854 to 1861, contains scattered entries about Kansas Territory and Adair's ministry. The first entry indicates that Adair and his wife are considering coming to Kansas Territory. Other entries relate to daily activities and Adair's ministry and include mentions of whom he visits and who is ill. The entry for February 4, 1861, notes that Kansas had been admitted to the Union.

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Samuel Lyle Adair to John Brown

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Samuel Adair wrote his brother-in-law John Brown from Osawatomie on October 2, 1857, to explain why he could not come see Brown in Iowa. Much of letter describes the general poor state of health in his locale, but he also comments on the political and especially the prospects for free state success in the upcoming election--Adair was not optimistic.

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Samuel L. Adair to Joseph Gordon

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

This is a copy of a letter written by Samuel Adair from Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. Adair thanks Reverend Gordon for $104 raised in Yellow Springs, Ohio, that was sent to James Garrison for "the benefit of sufferers in the cause of freedom in the Osawatomie vicinity." He describes the difficulties of distributing relief aid to everyone's satisfaction and mentions the Kansas Central Committee. He also writes of his concerns about how slavery and its demise will impact the nation using phrases such as "conflict of arms" and "fearful doom."

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Samuel L. Adair to Edmund Burke Whitman

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Writing from Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, Adair identifies what relief clothing (coats, socks, etc.) he still has on hand and accounts for cash received and expenses incurred.

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Samuel L. Adair to S. S. Jocelyn

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

In this draft letter, Samuel Adair writes from Hudson, Ohio, discussing his plans to meet with a "Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Society" party in Chicago. Adair indicates his family consisted of four people and describes the quantity of boxes and luggage they would bring with them. He also writes that he disapproved of traveling on the Sabbath.

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Samuel L. Adair to Mary P. Green

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

In this letter, Samuel Adair thanks Mary P. Green for $35 sent by the ladies of La Salle County, Illinois. He indicates that he would try to distribute the money to "no unworthy person," and that it would help relieve the suffering in the territory. He indicates that things were comparatively quiet. He refers to a lack of cash if settlers are required to pay for their land soon, as he fells most would need to take out mortgages. He reports that those suffering the most are families who were sick or where the men were in prison. He expresses gratitude for the support received from the East.

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Samuel L. Adair to S. S. Jocelyn

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

This letter was written in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, to Reverend Jocelyn, who was Samuel Adair's contact with the American Missionary Association. The first three pages deal with some disagreement over Adair's salary and support that was to be provided by the association, his efforts on behalf of religion, and prospects for a "union" church building that would be shared by several denominations. The last page discusses economic conditions in Kansas Territory and the difficulty of getting items to Kansas either via the Missouri River or by overland freighting from St. Louis. This appears to be a draft of a letter sent to Jocelyn.

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Samuel Lyle Adair to John Brown

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

From Osawatomie, Samuel Adair wrote his brother-in-law John Brown regarding monies Adair had received for the "free State men in Kansas" and specifies how these funds were distributed.

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Samuel L. Adair to S. S. Jocelyn

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

From Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, Samuel Adair writes that his family has been sick, and that others in the area have been ill or died. The bulk of his letter to Reverend Jocelyn deals with elections held by both proslavery and antislavery supporters in October 1855 and the number of Missourians that voted in the proslavery election on October 1. He describes the territorial legislature that met at Shawnee Mission. He indicates that a relative and his son and son-in-law have arrived in Kansas Territory, and that the relative had brought a number of weapons. The relative to whom he referred was probably John Brown, who was a half brother of Adair's wife, Florella. Samuel Adair writes that he is concerned about Brown's war-like attitude and describes a slaveholder who had left the territory because of concern about the "outcome." This appears to be a draft of a letter sent to Jocelyn.

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Abzuga (Zu) Adams diary

Adams, Abzuga (Zu), 1859-1911

This is the fourth diary in Abzuga (Zu) Adams' papers from November 19, 1908 to October 9, 1910. It contains family, domestic and work news with several entries about building the Memorial building in Topeka, Kansas. Zu Adams was born in Atchison, Kansas, in 1859, and named after for her father?s mother who also went by the nickname Zu. As a child, she lived in various Kansas towns including Waterville, Wichita, and Topeka. In 1876, when Zu was seventeen, her father became Secretary of the Kansas Historical Society where she worked as his unpaid assistant. Later she was given a salary and the title of librarian. At the time of her father?s death in 1899, Zu and her late Father had hoped she would succeed him as secretary but when George Martin emerged as a candidate, Zu withdrew her candidacy. She worked as Martin?s assistant until her death in 1911. From her experience as a secretary, the diary contains sections of short hand unique to Zu and are left to interpretation by the reader. Zu never married, remaining in the family home and raising her younger brothers and sisters and Helen who she adopted in 1896.

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