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Page 3 of 6, showing 10 records out of 59 total, starting on record 21, ending on 30

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Ernest Hiram Lindley

This black and white photograph shows Ernest Hiram Lindley, (1869-1940), the seventh chancellor of the University of Kansas, (1920-1939). During his first few years as chief executive officer he successfully secured $3.5 million dollars from the Kansas Legislature for building appropriations. With these funds a number of buildings were constructed across campus including: Hoch Auditorium, Strong Hall, Watson Library and the women's first dormitory, Corbin Hall. He was also instrumental in expanding the school's instructional offerings by establishing a school of business, and a school of chemical engineering and preventive medicine. For nineteen years, Lindley served as the chancellor of the University of Kansas, longer than anyone before him. However, after enduring a number of difficult years with the State Board of Administration over employment practices, he resigned on June 30, 1939. A year later the seventy-year old educator became ill while traveling abroad. He later died, on August 21, 1940, aboard the passenger liner Asama Maru with burial conducted at sea.

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Isaac Tichenor Goodnow

Isaac Goodnow was an early resident of Manhattan, Kansas, and was a free-state supporter. He was a delegate to the Leavenworth Constitutional Convention and was one of the founders of Bluemont College.

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John B. Dunbar

This is a portrait of John B. Dunbar who was born at Bellevue, Nebraska, on April 3, 1841, where his parents were Presbyterian missionaries to the Pawnee Indians. He attended Hopkins Academy, Hadley, Massachusetts, and graduated from Amherst College in 1864. From 1869 to 1878, he was professor of Latin and Greek languages at Washburn College in Topeka, Kansas. In 1872-73, he assisted Father Gaillard of St. Mary's mission in the preparation of a Pottawatomie grammar and dictionary. Later he compiled a brief grammar and partial vocabulary of the Pawnee language, but it was never published. After leaving Topeka, Dunbar was connected with the public schools at Deposit and Brooklyn, New York, and Bloomfield, New Jersey.

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Ernest Hiram Lindley

This black and white photograph shows Ernest Hiram Lindley, (1869-1940), the seventh chancellor of the University of Kansas, (1920 -1939). During his first few years as chief executive officer he successfully secured $3.5 million dollars from the Kansas Legislature for building appropriations. With these funds a number of buildings were constructed across campus including: Hoch Auditorium, Strong Hall, Watson Library and the woman's first dormitory Corbin Hall. He was also instrumental in expanding the school's instructional offerings by establishing a school of business, and a school of chemical engineering and a school of preventive medicine. For nineteen years Lindley served as the chancellor of the University of Kansas, longer than anyone before him. However, after enduring a number of difficult years with the State Board of Administration over employment practices he resigned on June 30, 1939. A year later the seventy-year old educator became ill while traveling abroad. He later died, on August 21, 1940, aboard the passenger liner Asama Maru burial was conducted at sea.

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Indenture, purchase of town lots by Bluemont College Trustees

This indenture outlines the terms of a sale of thirteen acres of land, sold by Thomas and Eleanor Wells to the Trustees of the Bluemont Central College Association, which included as its members Joseph Denison, Isaac Goodnow, Samuel D. Houston, Washington Marlott, C.E. Blood, and William A. McCullow.

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Kansas State Teachers College Emporia, Kansas

This black and white photograph shows a classroom at the Kansas State Teachers College in Emporia, Kansas. The students dressed in formal clothing are gathered in a large circle with their teachers. In the background, a group of women are observing the students and a Christmas tree has been decorated. A nearby chalkboard has decorations and stockings adorning it's surface.

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Luther Hart Platt, Jeremiah Evarts Platt, Henry Dutton Platt, and Enoch Platt

A portrait of Luther Hart Platt, Jeremiah Evarts Platt, Dutton Platt, and Enoch Platt, sons of Jireh and Sarah Platt, abolitionists in Mendon, Illinois. Jeremiah Platt, an abolitionist, came to the Kansas Territory to promote the anti-slavery cause. He was part of the Beecher Bible and Rifle Colony in Wabaunsee County, Kansas, and taught at Kansas State Agricultural College. Luther came to Kansas in 1865 and taught at Lincoln College, Topeka, Kansas, and later became a Congregational minister and served several churches in southeast and western Kansas.

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Ellen Douglas Denison Goodnow to Isaac Tichenor Goodnow

Goodnow, Ellen Douglass Denison, 1812-1890

Ellen Goodnow wrote to her husband, Isaac Goodnow, from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, briefly relating the news of a friend's sudden death. She attached a list of items she wished Isaac to purchase while he was in the East, which mostly consisted of clothing items, but also included a clock and a microscope.

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Ephraim Nute to Amos Adams Lawrence

Nute, Ephraim

Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. In a letter marked "private", Ephraim Nute wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Amos A. Lawrence in Massachusetts. Nute responded to Lawrence's suggestion that the college sit on the "broad table land on Mt. Oread or Capitol hill"; he supported the idea but feared that issues surrounding the land title would compromise the plan. Nute agreed with Lawrence about the importance of establishing schools, but he also concerned that the current political situation was not conducive to it, as the Territorial government was in the hands of "usurpers". He felt that "only one life now stands between us and the reopening of the civil war."

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Wendell Godwin

Topeka Trade School: Photography Dept

A black and white photo of Wendell R. Godwin. He served as Superintendent of Schools in Topeka, Kansas from 1951 to 1961. As superintendent of district #501 he had the difficult task, in the spring of 1953, of notifying black elementary teachers that their services would not be needed for the upcoming school year due to the pending Supreme Court case of Brown vs. Board of Education.

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