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Page 3 of 3, showing 10 records out of 30 total, starting on record 21, ending on 30

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Josiah Miller

Although born in South Carolina, Josiah Miller was a free state supporter. He attended college in Indiana and law school in New York. He came to Kansas in 1854 and on January 5, 1855, established the Kansas Free State newspaper in Lawrence. The newspaper office was destroyed by order of the territorial government on May 21, 1856 because is was deemed a nuisance. He was capturned by Buford's proslavery forces and was tried for treason against the state of South Carolina. He supported John C. Fremont. In 1857, he was elected probate judge of Douglas County, Kansas Territory.

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John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

In this rather lengthy letter from his home in Sumner, Ingalls commented on many different facets of his personal and professional life to date in Kansas Territory and about his prospects for the future; these included his law practice (now mostly in Atchison), his interest in journalism and politics, and his interest in a variety of speculative opportunities. The future of Kansas looked good to Ingalls, despite continued problems with drought that was forcing many to sell out.

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Milton M. Powers to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Milton M. Powers, Deputy Clerk of Court in Columbus, Ohio wrote to Cyrus K. Holliday, Free State leader and founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory. Powers had read of Holliday's activities in northern newspapers. A presentation of the Wrongs of Kansas, emphasizing Andrew H. Reeder and Samuel N. Wood's experiences, had emotionally motivated Powers to write and assure Holliday of his support. Once a Jeffersonian Democrat, but convicted that the party had abandoned its principles, Powers had become a Republican. He stated that the entire nation was attuned to events in Kansas Territory, and he believed that these events would have intense impact on the nation's future.

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National Kansas Committee, request for clothing and provisions

National Kansas Committee

This advertisement was attached to a receipt for the placement of a notice in the New York Times. The advertisement included information about how the people of New England could aid the fight for freedom in Kansas--both with funds and with labor. It also gave the names of National Kansas Committee members and an address for their New York office.

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Prospectus of the "White Cloud Chief."

Miller, Sol (Solomon), 1831-1897

Born at Lafayette, Indiana, on January 22, 1831, and raised in Ohio, Sol Miller "indentured" in the Germantown Gazette office in Germantown, Ohio, and in 1854 purchased half interest in that newspaper. Three years later he removed to White Cloud, Doniphan County and published the first issue of the White Cloud Kansas Chief on June 4, 1857. This printed "Prospectus" is signed by at least twenty "subscribers" who proposed "to commence the publication of paper bearing the above title [White Cloud Chief], early in the Spring of 1857" and describes the nature of the size, scope, etc., of the proposed newspaper to be edited and published by Miller.

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Horace Greeley

A photograph of Horace Greeley who was editor of the New York Tribune during the Kansas territorial era. He actively supported the free state cause in Kansas through editorials as well as coming to Kansas in 1859. He advocated resistance to the implementation of the Kansas-Nebraska Act and was involved in the founding of the Republican Party.

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L. W. Halbe collection

Halbe, L. W. (Leslie Winfield), 1893-1981

The L. W. (Leslie Winfield) Halbe photo collection consists of 1500 glass plate negatives produced by Halbe during his teenage years. Halbe lived in Dorrance, Russell County, Kansas, and began taking photographs of the region with an inexpensive Sears and Roebuck camera when he was fifteen years old.

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Samuel Clarke Pomeroy to Isaac Tichenor Goodnow

Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891

Samuel Pomeroy wrote to Isaac Goodnow from Atchison, Kansas Territory. Pomeroy told Goodnow he was not disposed at the moment to come to Manhattan on account of lawsuits and railroad business, but would come as soon as possible. He looked forward to being present when the cornerstone of the Bluemont College building was placed, and asked Goodnow to list him as a subscriber to Manhattan's new newspaper. Pomeroy also referred to the upcoming election the following June, which would determine the delegates to attend the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, and prayed for a successful outcome.

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Robert Allyn to Isaac Tichenor and Ellen Douglas Denison Goodnow

Allyn, Robert, 1817-1894

Robert Allyn wrote from Providence, Rhode Island, to his friends Isaac and Ellen Goodnow in Kansas Territory. Allyn, like Goodnow an educator, updated the couple on the construction of a new local Academy. He also reacted to news he had heard of political conditions in K.T., having found that "the papers are full of dreadful things about you horrid abolitionists in Kanzas", and asking him, "How do you contrive to live under the Missouri laws?" Showing himself to be a staunch Abolitionist as well, Allyn provides his own strong opinions and insights regarding the Kansas troubles. Allyn also advised that "getting up a few. . .free schools" would prompt a great rush of emigration from the Northern States to the Territory

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George Washington Martin

This photograph shows George Washington Martin holding a unidentified child. In 1857 Martin migrated from Pennsylvania to the Kansas Territory settling in Lecompton, where he secured a position with the pro-slavery paper the, ?Lecompton Union?, later becoming the ?National Democrat?. He relocated to Junction City, Kansas, establishing a career as a newspaper editor and publisher with the founding of the ?Junction City Union?. Actively involved in the community, Martin held several public offices from mayor of Junction City to serving in the Kansas House of Representatives. In 1888 he moved to Kansas City, Kansas establishing the ?Daily Gazette? newspaper. Martin was the managing editor of the newspaper until 1899 when he is elected secretary of the Kansas Historical Society. For fifteen years he collected and preserved Kansas history. Martin resigned from this position in February 1914 and was appointed secretary emeritus of the Kansas Historical Society. On March 27, 1914 Martin passed away in Topeka, Kansas.

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