Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Home and Family (Remove)
Type of Material -- Photographs (Remove)
Date (Remove)
Page 3 of 293, showing 10 records out of 2930 total, starting on record 21, ending on 30

| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9|

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

There is lots of big game in Kansas if you go after it right

Martin, William H., 1865-1940

This photomontage or exaggerated postcard shows two hunters carrying a giant rabbit after a day of hunting. In the background a fellow hunter and his dog are following.

previewthumb

Barbershop singers in Topeka, Kansas

Schrock, John Edward

These two photographs show barbershop singers serenading a customer in an onstage performance. The barbershop singers are young boys.

previewthumb

Peach canning time on the farm

Martin, William H., 1865-1940

This photomontage or exaggerated postcard shows a group of men canning and preserving oversize peaches.

previewthumb

Gathering corn in our country

Martin, William H., 1865-1940

This photomontage or exaggerated postcard shows a gentleman sawing off a giant ear of corn.

previewthumb

Sod house, Kinsley, Kansas

This black and white postcard shows the sod house at Half Way Park in Kinsley, Kansas. The park is located along the juncture of Kansas U.S. Highway 50 and 56 in Edwards County, Kansas.

previewthumb

Sod house, Kinsley, Kansas

Baumer, Beverly

This black and white photograph shows the sod house at Half Way Park in Kinsley, Kansas. The park is located along the juncture of Kansas U.S. Highway 50 and 56 in Edwards County, Kansas.

previewthumb

Sutherin Home in Topeka, Kansas

This black and white photograph shows the John Sutherin family in front of their home at 3716 West 6th in Topeka, Kansas, at the turn of the century. The Menninger Foundation purchased the home in 1946, remodeled it for the Northwest Office building for the Topeka Institute of Psychoanalysis, and occupied it in 1947. In 1925, the Menninger Sanitarium Corporation purchased a farmhouse on the west edge of Topeka, Kansas. The farmhouse became the inpatient clinic and the surrounding 20 acres were developed with buildings and gardens to become the "East Campus" of the Menninger Foundation. This building was an nearby farmhouse also purchased and remodeled as offices for the Topeka Institute of Psychoanalysis, an important addition in the Menninger philosophy of treatment. In 1982, the "West Campus", a much larger area, was developed west of Topeka. In 2003, the Menninger Foundation was moved to Houston, Texas.

previewthumb

The way we raise tomatoes in Kansas

Martin, William H., 1865-1940

This photomontage or exaggerated postcard shows a group of men picking oversize tomatoes.

previewthumb

Buttons from a Child's Treasure Trove, 14EW310

Shown are five of the 83 artifacts stored in a jar that was recovered during the Kansas Archeology Training Program excavation in 1996 at Fort Harker in Kanopolis, Kansas. The artifacts were discovered in a broken mustard jar, shown in the two slides, and may well represent a child's treasure, buried and forgotten sometime between the 1930s and the 1950s. Shown are four of the six buttons that were found: a lozenge-shaped shank button, two white plastic buttons now stained red/pink and a black and gold glass button. Slight traces of the silver coating on the belt buckle remain.

previewthumb

Isaac Goodnow residence, Manhattan, Kansas

This is a photograph of the Isaac T. Goodnow house well. Isaac T. Goodnow, a native of Vermont, came to Kansas in 1855 with the New England Emigrant Aid Company. The company had the idea of building a community, which would eventually become Manhattan. Goodnow became heavily involved in the free state disputes that argued whether Kansas ought to become a free or slave state. He became a co-founder and the first president of Bluemont College. Perhaps Goodnow's greatest contribution to the educational climate of Manhattan was his work in locating the Kansas Agricultural College there. The building and grounds of Bluemont College were donated to the state to serve as the foundation for the new institution, which developed into the present-day Kansas State University. Some 82,000 acres of land were given by the federal government to support the agricultural college. Goodnow converted more than half of this acreage into much needed cash during his tenure as land agent for the college from 1867 to 1873. Goodnow spent most of his life in service to the state of Kansas. He died in 1894. The house that he and his wife, Ellen, occupied is now Goodnow House State Historic Site, administered by the Kansas Historical Society.

previewthumb
| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9|

Home and Family

Type of Material -- Photographs

Date

Agriculture

Built Environment

Business and Industry

Collections

Community Life

Curriculum

Education

Environment

Government and Politics

Military

Objects and Artifacts

People

Places

Thematic Time Period

Transportation

Type of Material