Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions -- Lawyers (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Page 3 of 29, showing 10 records out of 284 total, starting on record 21, ending on 30

| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9|

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Glee S. Smith, Jr.

Cliff's Studio

This photograph shows Glee S. Smith, Jr., second from left, at a hospital drive, possibly in Larned, Kansas.

previewthumb

Dan Lykins and Roger Fincher

Lykins, Judy

Three photographs of Dan Lykins and Roger Fincher, Topeka attorneys, at the American Trial Lawyers Conference in Chicago, Illinois. They are posed with three political figures/Presidential candidates John Edwards, Howard Dean and Bill Richardson.

previewthumb

Dr. H. C. Perdue's Neosho County Advertiser, Erie, Kansas

This pamphlet titled The Neosho County Advertiser was published by Dr. H. C. Perdue, M. D., in Erie, Kansas. It contains approximately 50 pages of descriptions of medical cures and other advertising. Descriptions of Dr. Perdue's Ague Cure and other medical treatments are on pages 2-28, and other advertisements are on pages 29-49, plus the inside and outside of the back cover. Besides information on Dr. Perdue's medical practice, there are numerous advertisements for drug stores. Drug stores listed in the advertisements (and their town locations, all in Kansas) include: Palace Drug Store, Erie; Ira Steinberger Drug Store, Erie; New City Drug Store, Erie; Dr. C. E. Steadman, Druggist, Osage Mission; I. N. Wherrett General Merchandise and Drugs, Vietsburg; M. Devine, Druggist, Osage Mission; Baldwin House Drug Store, Thayer; W. R. Kramer, Druggist, Chanute; John McCarthy, Druggist, Galesburg; and Mrs. Samuel Whelpley, Druggist, Morehead. Druggists listed as references for Dr. Perdue include Charles H. Eaton and J. T. Brown, both of Erie. Other businesses and professions advertised include attorneys, real estate agents, merchants, banks, doctors, clothing stores, millinery and dress making stores, grocery stores, jewelry stores, candy stores, cigar stores, meat markets, bakeries, livery stables, abstracters, tree nurseries, buggy harness stores, carpenters, hardware stores, fur dealers, barber shops, lumber companies, monument dealers, dry goods, dentists, hotels, and furniture stores.

previewthumb

Alfred Gray

Leonard & Martin

Alfred Gray was an attorney, secretary of the State Board of Agriculture from "187_ to 1880," and a resident of Quindaro, Kansas Territory. Gray was involved in a number of land and other business dealings. This photograph was taken in 1882,

previewthumb

Theodosius Botkin

Dimock, S. W.

A portrait of Theodosius Botkin taken in Topeka, Kansas when he served in the legislature. He came to Kansas in 1865 and settled in Linn County. He taught school and was later principal at Pleasanton for four years. In 1875, he located to Mound City and was admitted to the bar. Botkin served as probate judge in Linn County and police judge of Mound City. In March 1889, Governor Humphrey appointed him judge of the Thirty-Second District in Stevens County. It was in his court that Samuel N. Wood was assassinated in June, 1891. Impeachment proceedings were brought against Botkin, but he was acquitted on all charges. Botkin resigned the judgeship on October 11, 1892 and he moved to Hutchinson, Kansas. In 1896 he was elected to the Kansas House of Representatives from Reno County. A year later he was named commander of the Grand Army, Department of Kansas. In 1901 he settled in Salt Lake, Utah where he practiced law. Botkin died May 27, 1918 in Salt Lake.

previewthumb

Theodosius Botkin

This portrait of Theodosius Botkin was possibly taken in Hutchinson, Kansas. He came to Kansas in 1865 and settled in Linn County. He taught school and was later principal at Pleasanton for four years. In 1875, he located to Mound City and was admitted to the bar. Botkin served as probate judge in Linn County and police judge of Mound City. In March 1889, Governor Humphrey appointed him judge of the Thirty-Second District in Stevens County. It was in his court that Samuel N. Wood was assassinated in June, 1891. Impeachment proceedings were brought against Botkin, but he was acquitted on all charges. Botkin resigned the judgeship on October 11, 1892 and he moved to Hutchinson, Kansas. In 1896 he was elected to the Kansas House of Representatives from Reno County. A year later he was named commander of the Grand Army, Department of Kansas. In 1901 he settled in Salt Lake, Utah where he practiced law. Botkin died May 27, 1918 in Salt Lake.

previewthumb

Men [and women] of Kansas

Topeka Capital

This volume is a collection of portraits of Kansas business owners, professionals, public officials, and politicians in 1905. Despite its title, this volume does include women also. The women included are physicians, osteopaths, and educators. The professions covered include: educators, clergy, lawyers, bankers, real estate, life insurance, lodge officials, architects, postmasters, physicians, dentists, artists, telephones, utilities, merchants, manufacturers, osteopathy, U.S. marshals, government officials, editors and publishers, railroads, military, and photographers. A name index begins on page 633 and it is also reproduced under Text Version below.

previewthumb

James Barnes Whitaker correspondence

This collection includes materials related to all aspects of James Barnes Whitaker's professional life, including his real estate business and his legal career, particularly for the pensioners he helped. He came to Tecumseh, Shawnee County in 1856 and worked there as a surveyor. In 1857, he moved to Topeka where he remained, serving as county sheriff, surveyor, and Topeka city engineer. He owned an abstract and real estate business in Topeka and was an attorney, representing numerous Civil War veterans in obtaining disability pensions, many of whom served in Kansas units. The collection consists of Whitaker's correspondence (arranged chronologically) and Whitaker's 1857 certificate of appointment as a U.S. Deputy Marshal.

previewthumb

Temperance history correspondence

Correspondence sent and received by Rev. Robert Norris, secretary of the Kansas State Temperance Union, and Julian K. Codding, attorney for the Kansas State Temperance Union. Correspondents include Elizabeth P. Hutchinson and Minnie Wood, presidents of the Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Rev. J. M. Dunlavy, president of the Crawford County Civil League and Third Congressional District of the KSTU, Rev. J. W. Primrose, superintendent of the Second Congressional District of the KSTU in Fort Scott, John Wiswell, chairman of the Cherokee County Law Enforcement Aid Committee, and representatives from the Anti-Saloon League of America. Much of the correspondence concerns efforts to advance anti-liquor agendas in local, state, and national politics. Although Kansas was the first state to adopt a constitutional amendment prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors in 1880, the law was largely unenforced.

previewthumb

Temperance history correspondence

Correspondence sent and received by the Kansas State Temperance Union (KSTU). Rev. Robert Norris acted as secretary, John Marshall, attorney, and Julian K. Codding, attorney and later president of the Kansas State Temperance Union. Correspondents include Elizabeth P. Hutchinson, president of the Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Rev. J.M. Dunlavy, superintendent of the Third Congressional District of the KSTU, Rev. J.W. Primrose, superintendent of the Second Congressional District of the KSTU, Mary Evelyn Dobbs, president of the Third District of the Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union, the Kansas State Prohibition Committee, and representatives from the Anti-Saloon League of America. Much of the correspondence concerns efforts to advance anti-liquor agendas in local, state, and national politics. Although Kansas was the first state to adopt a constitutional amendment prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors in 1880, the law was largely unenforced.

previewthumb
| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9|

Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions

Agriculture

Built Environment

Business and Industry

Collections

Community Life

Curriculum

Date

Education

Environment

Government and Politics

Home and Family

Military

Objects and Artifacts

People

Places

Thematic Time Period

Transportation

Type of Material