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Page 4 of 16, showing 10 records out of 156 total, starting on record 31, ending on 40

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

First Thanksgiving Sermon

McVicar, Peter, 1829-1903

This sermon by Rev. Peter McVicar's sermons is entitled "First Thanksgiving Sermon." It was delivered in Topeka on November 29, 1860, just weeks after he assumed the pastorate of the Congregational Church. McVicar focused on the concept that God's blessings were not to be measured by the accumulation of money or property, making specific comments about Kansas. He suggested, for example, that citizens of Kansas Territory who gathered together on that day should be especially thankful for the hardships endured by "early" settlers in order to establish freedom from slavery.

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Samuel Lyle Adair to John Brown

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Samuel Adair wrote his brother-in-law John Brown from Osawatomie on October 2, 1857, to explain why he could not come see Brown in Iowa. Much of letter describes the general poor state of health in his locale, but he also comments on the political and especially the prospects for free state success in the upcoming election--Adair was not optimistic.

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Samuel Lyle Adair

Revernd Samuel L. Adair and his wife, Florella Brown Adair, settled near Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. Adair was a Congregational minister and free state supporter. His wife was a half sister to abolitionist John Brown, and Brown occasionally stayed with the Adairs. The family was involved in various free state and relief activities.

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Isaac McCoy

A portrait of missionary Reverend Isaac McCoy at age 47. Copied from a painting. Born the son of a Baptist preacher in Uniontown, Pennsylvania, in 1784, McCoy spent his youth in Louisville, Kentucky. He married at age nineteen and moved to the Indiana Territory to preach in communities of settlers, French traders, and Indians. While there, McCoy witnessed what he considered the degradation and suffering of tribes at the hands of whites. He was one of the first to suggest the removal of Eastern tribes to the West. McCoy achieved mild success operating missions in Michigan and Indiana Territory, and training future Kansas missionaries, such as Jotham Meeker, Johnston Lykins, and Robert Simmerwell. He spent progressively more time in Washington D.C., lobbing for the establishment of reservations in the future states of Kansas and Oklahoma. McCoy found sympathy for his proposals, and in 1830 personally surveyed future Indian lands in what would become Kansas. The following year McCoy moved his family to Westport, Missouri, near present-day Kansas City.

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Ephraim Nute to Edward Everett Hale

Nute, Ephraim

Rev. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Nute inquired about the possibility of Hale arranging a loan of $2000 at reasonable interest for the completion of the Unitarian Church in Lawrence. He reported on the high rates of interest being charged for loans in Kansas Territory and on the general effects of the panic of 1857 on the territorial economy. Nute also expressed his dissatisfaction with the Buchanan administration's handling of the Lecompton Constitution and his hope that a change in presidential administration in 1860 would result in Kansas' admission as a free state.

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Jotham Meeker to Rev. S. Peck

Meeker, Jotham, 1804-1855

Jotham Meeker, misionary and printer, arrived in Kansas in 1833 and set up a printing press at Shawnee Baptist Mission. Meeker joined the Ottawa Indians in 1837 and founded a mission on the Marais des Cygnes River where present day Ottawa stands. The Ottawa Indians began moving to Kansas from Ohio in the early 1830s. Meeker opened his letter with personal matters and them turned to affairs concerning the Indians in Kansas. He talked about cholera, which killed many Indians in the summer of 1849.

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Samuel L. Adair to S. S. Jocelyn

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

This letter was written in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, to Reverend Jocelyn, who was Samuel Adair's contact with the American Missionary Association. The first three pages deal with some disagreement over Adair's salary and support that was to be provided by the association, his efforts on behalf of religion, and prospects for a "union" church building that would be shared by several denominations. The last page discusses economic conditions in Kansas Territory and the difficulty of getting items to Kansas either via the Missouri River or by overland freighting from St. Louis. This appears to be a draft of a letter sent to Jocelyn.

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Samuel L. Adair to Mary P. Green

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

In this letter, Samuel Adair thanks Mary P. Green for $35 sent by the ladies of La Salle County, Illinois. He indicates that he would try to distribute the money to "no unworthy person," and that it would help relieve the suffering in the territory. He indicates that things were comparatively quiet. He refers to a lack of cash if settlers are required to pay for their land soon, as he fells most would need to take out mortgages. He reports that those suffering the most are families who were sick or where the men were in prison. He expresses gratitude for the support received from the East.

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Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown, daughter of John Stillman Brown

Webber, L. R.

This letter, written by Leigh R. Webber from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, was addressed to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown. Webber wrote about sickness in the Brown family and about other personal matters, such as her father's work as a minister. He also kept her apprised of politics, both in Kansas and on the national scene, and spoke briefly of John Brown's "insane undertaking."

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Edmund Burke Whitman to Samuel L. Adair

Whitman, E. B. (Edmund Burke), 1812-1883

Whitman writes from (presumably) Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to ask Samuel Adair for his assistance in distributing remaining relief clothing before winter. He includes instructions for notifying the public of the availability of relief goods and indicates that whomever Adair "knows to be in absolute want" should have first priority. Whitman feels the task of distribution would not take longer than one week. He also wants Adair to estimate the number of poor families in his [Adair's] community.

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