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Page 4 of 10, showing 10 records out of 100 total, starting on record 31, ending on 40

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

The poor donkey has too many drivers

Judge Magazine

In this political cartoon from the satirical magazine Judge, Populist senators William Peffer and ?Sockless? Jerry Simpson push a boulder (symbolizing the Farmer?s Alliance) under the wheel of a wagon that represents the United States. In the driver?s seat are five congressmen, each with their own agenda labeled on their sash. The wagon is being pulled by a donkey signifying ?democracy.? Judge magazine, created by artists who had allied with the Republican Party, began in 1881 and its sales eventually surpassed those of its rival, Puck.

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James Henry Lane

Brady, Mathew B., 1823 (ca.)-1896

This is a portrait of James Henry Lane, 1814-1866, United States senator from Kansas, 1861-1866. The photograph taken by renowned Civil War-era photographer Matthew Brady.

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Joseph Little Bristow, United States Senator, to Dwight David Eisenhower

Bristow, Joseph L. (Joseph Little), 1861-1944

This letter from Joseph Little Bristow, 1861-1944, United States Senator, to Dwight David Eisenhower, 1890-1969, informs him of his nomination to West Point Military Academy. The complete set of correspondence related to Eisenhower's appointment to a military academy is available in Kansas Memory item 208267.

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Part 12: Exodusters, in first annual report of the Bureau of Labor and Industrial Statistics

Kansas Bureau of Labor

This excerpt of the Kansas Bureau of Labor report includes only Part 12, the portion of the report focusing on the Exodusters in Wyandotte, Kansas. The report includes transcribed testimonies of Exodusters as well as a detailed table showing statistics compiled from seventeen families, including their location, ages, health, and occupations. The report also includes a few references to Exodusters in Topeka.

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Kansas territorial census, 1855. District 17

Johnson, Alex S.

This census was taken in order to determine eligible voters for elections to be held as proclaimed by Governor Andrew Reeder on November 10, 1854. The categories for information in the census were name, occupation, age, male, female, emigrated from, native of United States, naturalized citizen, declarant (intention to become a citizen), Negro, slave, and voter. Only white males over 21 were eligible to vote. The districts used for the census were the same as the election districts. A statistical summary of the census follows the enumeration pages. For District 17, the place of election was the house of B. F. Robinson. The boundaries of each district were described in Governor Reeder's proclamation and it is difficult to determine what counties were in each district. The 17th Dist was organized by a supplemental proclamation of the governor, Nov. 25, 1854. He declared that it seemed expedient that the first district should be divided to form the 17th district, which was located in the east part of the present Johnson county, quoted as to bounds as follows, (from the ex minutes, 1854, p. 24.) "beginning at the mouth of the Kansas river; thence up said river to the mouth of Cedar creek; thence up said creek to the Santa Fe Road; thence by said road and the Missouri State Line to the place of beginning."

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Wyatt Earp

Masterson, Bat, 1853-1921

Portrait of Wyatt Earp copied from William Barclay Masterson's "Famous Gunfighters of the Western Frontier" published in "Human Life".

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Between Millstones

Kelly, H. B.

This short pamphlet discusses the problems that high tariffs and the gold standard create for workers and farmers. It clearly presents Populist ideas about the dire situation of Kansas farmers by giving several examples of how businessmen and merchants benefit from the oppression of common laborers. The pamphlet was written by H. B. Kelly and printed by the Jeffersonian Publishing Company in Lawrence, Kansas; each pamphlet cost five cents.

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Lilla Day Monroe and Lillian Mitchner

Lilla Day Monroe (left) was one of Topeka?s leading citizens during the early part of the twentieth century. Over the course of her life, she served as president of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association, editor of "The Club Member" and "The Kansas Woman?s Journal," and as a founding member of the Good Government Club. Lillian Mitchner (right) was state president of the Kansas Woman?s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU).

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Part I: Child Labor in Sixth Annual Report of the Bureau of Labor and Industrial Statistics

Kansas. Dept. of Labor and Industry

Part I of this government report addresses the problem of child labor in Kansas, which appeared to be increasing. Most of the report focuses on existing child labor laws in Kansas, statistics about child employment (broken down by county, child?s age, ethnic background, etc?), and the industries that employed children. The report also addresses school attendance and truancy laws (which would effectively curb the unlawful employment of children) and includes the results of interviews with school superintendents and questionnaires filed out by those known to employ children in their businesses. School superintendents were overwhelmingly in favor of compulsory education, and most employers believed that it was important for children to understand the value of hard work (although some did speak about the benefits of school).

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Kansas Emergency Relief Committee accomplishments movie

Kansas. Emergency Relief Commission

This motion picture film documents the various work projects completed in Kansas during President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal. It begins with an introduction to the Kansas Emergency Relief Committee personnel, starting with the executive director, John G. Stutz. It then shows the various projects across the state, including the construction of farm ponds and lakes as part of the Water Conservation Program, the renovation and construction of courthouses, schools, libraries, and other public buildings, and the weaving and sewing rooms that produced clothing for needy Kansans. It also includes footage of rabbit drives, dust storms, and women sweeping piles of dust out of their homes. Click on the thumbnails below to play each clip. Click on Text Version for a detailed description of each chapter.

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