Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Government and Politics (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Page 4 of 138, showing 10 records out of 1372 total, starting on record 31, ending on 40

| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9|

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

A. J. Arnold to Joseph Hebbard

Arnold, A. J.

In this brief but informative letter A. J. Arnold, a Topeka, Kansas, druggist, informs Joseph Hebbard, treasurer of the Farmer's Alliance, of his decision to switch his allegiance from the Democratic Party to the People's (Populist) Party. He is eager to "release the state of Kansas from the misrule of the Republican Party." While Arnold is confident that he has made the right decision, he also notes that many other Democrats are wavering. Consequently, Arnold has prepared a letter to the Democrats that expresses the benefits of supporting Populism; he asks Hebbard to read through the draft of this letter and provide comments. This enclosure is not with the original letter and has not been located.

previewthumb

Arthur Capper, Alfred Mossman Landon, and Henry A. Wallace

Associated Press

This photograph represents Kansas Governor Alfred Mossman Landon in the center with United State Senator Arthur Capper on the right and Henry A. Wallace on the left in the office of the Secretary of Agriculture. The meeting took place on March 26, 1935 to discuss their plan for controlling dust storms in the Mid-West.

previewthumb

A handbook of useful information for immigrants and settlers

Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railway Company

Published by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad, this pamphlet encouraged agricultural settlement on railroad lands in Kansas by glorifying the state's natural resources including water, soil, mineral deposits and plant life. Printed by the Kansas Farmer in Topeka, Kansas.

previewthumb

Medical history of the 19th Regiment, Kansas Cavalry Volunteers

Bailey, Mahlon

Mahlon Bailey, the regimental surgeon, recorded this medical history of the 19th Kansas Cavalry. This history includes information on the hasty physicals given to new recruits, wounds received in battle, and other medical problems encountered on the trail, as well as general information about the day-to-day activities of the soldiers. Located at the end of the report is a chart detailing the medical problems of the regiment, including the number of cases of dysentery, gonorrhea, pneumonia, ulcers, burns, and sprains (among many others). At the end of these charts, Bailey expresses his appreciation to the commanders of the regiment, thanking them for following his medical advice and showing concern for the health of their soldiers.

previewthumb

William Eugene Stanley

Baldwin, Fred

These two cabinet cards show William Eugene Stanley, (1844-1910). Stanley, a native of Ohio, settled in Jefferson County, Kansas in 1870 to practice law. He entered public service in 1871, by serving as the Jefferson County attorney from 1871 to 1872. A few years later he became the Sedgwick County attorney from 1874 to 1880. In 1880, he made a political bid for a seat in the Kansas House of Representatives and served one term as a Republican from the ninety-second district from 1881 to 1883. Stanley resumed his political career in 1898, when he was elected the fifteenth governor of Kansas and was re-elected in 1901. During his administration, the Kansas supreme court was increased to seven justices and funds were appropriated to finish the construction on the statehouse. Stanley left office on January 12, 1903 to return to private life in Wichita, Kansas and to practice law.

previewthumb

Rural Free Delivery carriers, Delphos, Kansas

Ballou, Don D.

This black and white photograph shows a group of Rural Free Delivery, (R.F.D.) carriers delivering the Christmas mail in Delphos, Kansas. The men have been identified from left to right as the following: L.C. Talcott, Aristotle Black, ___ Hardy, and Albert E. Fitch on a Thor motorcycle.

previewthumb

Eagle wheat weaving

Banbury, Joyce

Wheat weaving artist Joyce Banbury presented this eagle to Governor John Carlin in Topeka on August 18, 1986. The weaving was given on behalf of the Kansas Wheat Commission (KWC) to recognize Governor Carlin?s support for wheat producers. Joyce Banbury, of Russell, Kansas, was commissioned by KWC to complete the weaving. She was a skilled artist who wrote books on wheat weaving and was frequently featured in craft magazines. Banbury and her son specialized in growing vintage wheat breeds with long stems suitable for weaving. The eagle took two days to weave and it is made from a vintage hard winter wheat grown by Banbury on her Russell farm.

previewthumb

Isabella Barnes to Governor Edward Hoch

Barnes, Isabella

Mrs. Isabella Barnes of Liberal, Kansas, writes Governor Edward Hoch of Topeka concerning her wish to wear men's clothing. Mrs. Barnes states that she would like to wear men's clothing to help her obtain suitable employment and avoid unwanted insults from men. She has contacted the U. S. Attorney General at Washington D. C. concerning this issue and asks Governor Hoch if she would be liable to arrest and if there was not some way for a woman to receive permission to wear men's clothes. Isabella's concerns illustrate many women's efforts to transcend narrowly defined social and sexual roles in the early twentieth century.

previewthumb

Elam Bartholomew diary

Bartholomew, Elam

Elam Bartholomew was a resident of Rooks County and Hays, Kansas. He was a horticulturalist, internationally known for his work with fungi. His diary reflects his active participation in Republican Party politics, local government, the United Presbyterian Church, farm organizations, and experimental farming. Elam Bartholomew settled in Rooks County, Kansas, in 1874. He was born in Pennsylvania and his family moved to Ohio and then Illinois. In 1873 he became engaged to Rachel Montgomery and returned to Illinois to marry her in June 1876. They returned to Kansas in September of 1876. The Bartholomews lived on their farm on Bow Creek until 1929 when they moved to Hays, where he served as curator of the mycological museum at Fort Hays Kansas State College. He died in 1934.

previewthumb

Elam Bartholomew diary

Bartholomew, Elam

Elam Bartholomew was a resident of Rooks County and Hays, Kansas. He was a horticulturalist internationally known for his work with fungi. His diary reflects his active participation in Republican Party politics, local government, the United Presbyterian Church, farm organizations, and experimental farming. Elam Bartholomew settled in Rooks County, Kansas, in 1874. He was born in Pennsylvania and his family moved to Ohio and then Illinois. In 1873 he became engaged to Rachel Montgomery and returned to Illinois to marry her in June 1876. They returned to Kansas in September of 1876. The Bartholomews lived on their farm on Bow Creek until 1929 when they moved to Hays where he served as curator of the mycological museum at Fort Hays Kansas State College. He died in 1934.

previewthumb
| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9|

Government and Politics

Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions

Agriculture

Built Environment

Business and Industry

Collections

Community Life

Curriculum

Date

Education

Environment

Home and Family

Military

Objects and Artifacts

People

Places

Thematic Time Period

Transportation

Type of Material