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Page 5 of 13, showing 10 records out of 125 total, starting on record 41, ending on 50

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

A.A. Graham to Governor Henry J. Allen

Graham, A. A. (Albert Adams), 1848-

Attorney A.A. Graham writes Governor Henry Allen with a model for the proposed industrial court that expands the authority of the Public Utilities Commission. The governor has called a special session of the Kansas Legislature to end labor strikes and resolve industrial disputes.

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Vern Miller

A photograph showing Vern Miller, Kansas Attorney General. A native of Wichita, Kansas, he was hired as a Sedgwick County Deputy Sheriff and served from 1949-1954. In 1958, Miller was elected Sedgwick County Marshal and served two terms. He was elected Sedgwick County Sheriff in 1964 and re-elected twice. At the beginning of his second term, he graduated from Oklahoma City University Law School. In 1970, Miller was elected Kansas State Attorney General and served two terms. After an unsuccessful bid for governor, he started a private practice in Wichita, Kansas. From 1976-1980, he served as Sedgwick County Prosecuting Attorney.

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The law and lawyers in Kansas history

Kansas State Historical Society

A collection of papers presented at the116th Annual Meeting of the Kansas State Historical Society on October 4 and 5, 1991. The essays cover four general themes: the law and the settlement process, the law as it relates to the liquor question, the history of the courts which have administered the law in Kansas, and women as attorneys and lawmakers.

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Vern Miller

Rorabaugh & Millsap Studio

This black and white photograph shows Kansas Attorney General Vern Miller. A native of Wichita, Kansas, and a veteran of World War II, he began his career as sheriff of Sedgwick County, Kansas, (1964-1969). As sheriff, he enforced the law in a aggressive hands-on manner by putting himself in the same dangers that patrol officers faced. This style of law enforcement, quickly earned him the nickname "Supercop" and "Supersheriff". Miller's ambitions to effectively enforce Kansas laws, would elect him in 1970 as the first Democratic attorney general in over eighty years. During his tenure as attorney general, Miller's "supercop" mentality continued as he enforced the drug, alcohol, and gambling laws in the state. Miller's relentless efforts to up hold the law reelected him in 1972 when he carried all 105 counties. Before the close of his second term, Miller 's political career took a new direction with his candidacy for Kansas Governor. During the 1974 election, he campaign on the emphasis of law enforcement rather than the details of state government. In the end, Miller could not make the transition to governor, and lost to Republican candidate Robert Bennett. With the loss, Miller closed out his career as attorney general and returned to Wichita, Kansas, to practice law.

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Glee S. Smith, Jr.

This is a photograph of Glee S. Smith, Jr. who lived and practiced law in Larned, Kansas, and later Lawrence, Kansas. He was born in Rozel, Kansas, on April 29, 1921. Smith obtained his bachelors and law degrees from the University of Kansas and was a member of Delta Tau Delta fraternity. He served as a First Lieutenant in the Army Air Corps during World War II. Smith served twelve years on the Larned Board of Education and four years as county attorney. He also served as a member on many philanthropic and business corporate boards, including two life insurance companies and bank boards in other cities. He served 16 years in the Kansas State Senate with eight years as President of the Senate. Later, he served on the Kansas Board of Regents. In 1975, he was appointed by President Ford to the Board of the National Legal Services Corporation. Smith served ten years as a member of the Board of Governors of the Kansas Bar Association and ten years as one of three Kansas delegates to the House of Delegates of the American Bar Association.

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Paul Robert Wunsch

A portrait of Paul Robert Wunsch, a lawyer from Kingman County, Kansas. Wunsch was elected from the thirty fourth district to serve in the Kansas House of Representatives 1937 to 1943, and served as Speaker of the House from 1943 to 1944. Wunsch was elected to the Kansas Senate and served from 1945 to 1964. As a state senator, he was instrumental in bringing Wichita University into the state system of higher education.

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Eugene Ware correspondence

This is a series of correspondence to and from Eugene Fitch Ware (1841-1911). Ware moved to Fort Scott, Kansas, after the Civil War and became employed at the Fort Scott Monitor. In 1879, Ware began the first of three terms in the Kansas State Senate. During his terms of office, Ware introduced bills concerning railroads, life insurance, militia, and relief and support of the poor as well as bills of a more local nature. Ware moved to Topeka in 1893 to become a partner with Charles Gleed and his brother, James, forming the law firm of Gleed, Ware and Gleed. In addition to journalism, law, and politics, Ware used the pseudonym, Ironquill, for his literary and poetic achievements. His works include "Neutralia" and "The Rhymes of Ironquill". For a complete contents list of the papers of Eugene Fitch Ware, see the External Links below.

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William Addison Phillips

Portrait of William Addison Phillips, an author, lawyer, journalist and politician. In 1857, Phillips attended the Constitution Convention at Topeka and the Free State Conventions at Centropolis, Lawrence, and Grasshopper Falls. He founded the town of Salina in April, 1858. In that same month and year, Phillips was nominated at the Topeka Free-State Convention under the Leavenworth Constitution to serve as a supreme court judge. He attended the Convention at Osawatomie and the Republican State Convention at Lawrence in 1859. Phillips served in the Kansas Volunteer Regiments and rose to the rank of colonel. From March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1875 Phillips was an at large representative to the United States Congress and from March 4, 1875 to March 3, 1879 he represented the First District.

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Vern Miller, Kansas Attorney General

A photograph showing Vern Miller, Kansas Attorney General, going to trial at a District Court.

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George W. Espey to Governor John A. Martin

George W. Espey, an agent of the Palace Drug Store in Ashland, Kansas, writes to Governor John A. Martin in Topeka asking whether he must quit selling alcohol because the county clerk does not have the proper affidavit form for him to fill out to renew his license. Espey asks for a prompt reply because the county attorney has stopped him from doing business.

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