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Thematic Time Period -- Immigration and Settlement, 1854 - 1890 (Remove)
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Page 5 of 8, showing 10 records out of 72 total, starting on record 41, ending on 50

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Samuel L. Adair to S. S. Jocelyn

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Samuel Adair and his family had just arrived in Kansas City, Missouri. This appears to be a draft of a letter he sent to Reverend S. S. Jocelyn of the American Missionary Society to describe the poor conditions for settlers in Kansas Territory, his and his wife's illnesses, and that the doctor who treated them owned slaves.

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Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown

Webber, L. R.

This letter, written by Leigh R. Webber from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, was addressed to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. Webber discussed personal issues such as the health of the Brown family, the weather and agricultural issues. He wrote about Kansas and national politics, including Charles Robinson?s role as governor under the new Leavenworth Constitution and James H. Lane's political ambitions. The latter part of the letter focused on John Brown. Webber was conflicted about the morality of Brown?s violent actions; while he deemed them ?reckless and hopeless,? he also believed they may have been provoked by Brown?s own religious beliefs and the violence of ?the slave power".

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G. S. Lewis to Samuel L. Adair

Lewis, G. S.

G. S. Lewis,a friend of Samuel Adair, writes from Albany in Athens County, Ohio. Lewis was concerned about the safety of the Adair family, and commented on the trials they must be suffering. He comments on the bravery of Charley, the Adair's son who helped warn Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, of the coming of proslavery forces prior to the Battle of Osawatomie. Lewis also comments on John Brown, Gov. Geary, John Freemont, and the political situation in Kansas Territory and nationally. He shares rumors of slave insurrections in Kentucky and Tennessee.

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James Griffing to J. Augusta Goodrich

Griffing, James S. (James Sayre), 1822-1882

James Griffing wrote from the steamboat New Lucy on the Missouri River to his fiancee, J. Augusta Goodrich, in Owego, New York. Griffing, a Methodist minister, was on his way back to New York to get married. He commented upon the concerns that Ms. Goodrich likely was experiencing as she prepared to leave her New York home to join him in Kansas Territory. Griffing tried to convince Ms. Goodrich that they would make a good home for themselves in Kansas. He also expressed the opinion that the "excitement upon the slavery question" in Kansas Territory was exaggerated, and that serious violence over the issue was unlikely.

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Historical Sketch, Confession of Faith and Covenant, and Standing Rules

First Church of Christ, Wabaunsee

This printed pamphlet contained all of the items listed in the title for the First Church of Christ in Wabaunsee, Wabaunsee County, Kansas Territory. The church was also known as the Beecher Bible and Rifle Church.

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List of clothing articles

Bourne, S.

This is a detailed list of the articles of clothing sent to Kansas by the First Congregational Church in Flushing, New York. It includes dresses, frocks, coats, skirts, pants, drawers, shirts, socks, vests, boots and gloves as well as other items. The pastor of the church, S. Bourne, emphasized the quality and durability of the clothing.

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Elam Bartholomew diary

Bartholomew, Elam

Elam Bartholomew was a resident of Rooks County and Hays, Kansas. He was a horticulturalist, internationally known for his work with fungi. His diary reflects his active participation in Republican Party politics, local government, the United Presbyterian Church, farm organizations, and experimental farming. Elam Bartholomew settled in Rooks County, Kansas, in 1874. He was born in Pennsylvania and his family moved to Ohio and then Illinois. In 1873 he became engaged to Rachel Montgomery and returned to Illinois to marry her in June 1876. They returned to Kansas in September of 1876. The Bartholomews lived on their farm on Bow Creek until 1929 when they moved to Hays, where he served as curator of the mycological museum at Fort Hays Kansas State College. He died in 1934.

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G. W. Paddock diary

Paddock, G. W.

G. W. Paddock was a minister and free-state supporter who came to Kansas Territory in 1857. He describes his daily activities and his religious work, as well as his impressions of the city of Wyandotte while the constitutional convention was meeting there. His entries for this time period indicate he visited the convention, although he does not discuss the substance of the proceedings. The 1857 portion describes some of the free state controversies. He also mentions working with American Indians; however, his descriptions are often stereotypical and uncomplimentary. A number of entries from this diary were selected, but the entire diary is not included.

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Rules for Congregational church funds disbursement

Congregational Church Building Committee

The rules identify the conditions under which Congregational churches or societies receive funds for building a Congregational church in a specific community. The money came from the "Fore Father's Day Fund" which was to be used to erect churches in the West. Samuel Adair was a member of the committee which met in Topeka, Kansas Territory.

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Samuel Newell Simpson to Hiram Hill

Simpson, Samuel Newell

Samuel N. Simpson wrote to Hiram Hill from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, updating him on the status of Hill's rents and outlining the rental agreements he had arranged with the various tenants. Simpson mentioned he had raised the $5000 for the church, as promised, and that Hill's money could not be invested in Wyandotte lands until they were properly surveyed. He added that he had recently brought firearms to Kansas Territory, stating " I think our trouble in Kansas has only begun -- but let the war and even dissolution come -- the quicker the better."

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