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Page 5 of 8, showing 10 records out of 73 total, starting on record 41, ending on 50

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Hiram Hill to S. G. How

Hill, Hiram, 1804-

Hiram Hill wrote from Williamsburgh, Massachusetts, to S. G. How, of the "Kansas Committee for Receiving and Dispersing" funds. Hill inquired how and in what manner any money sent to Kansas would be applied: "I have some money in my hand and we can rais [sic] more if we can have any prospect of its getting to Kansas and doing any good".

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R. S. Griffithe, N. W. Spicer, and J. A. Harvey testimonies

These testimonies, collected by the National Kansas Committee, record the experiences of three settlers during the turbulent times of Bleeding Kansas. The testimonies focus on each settler's involvement in free-state activities, and their interaction with Missouri border ruffians. Griffithe and Spicer both served in the free-state militia, and Harvey, who had commanded an emigrant train from Chicago, was the commander of a free-state company.

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Kansas Affairs

Daniels, Edward

Edward Daniels wrote "to the Friends of Free Kansas" from the office of the National Kansas Committee in Chicago, Illinois, on December 1, 1856. Daniels had just returned from the Kansas Territory, and presented nine "facts and suggestions" to explain how people in the East could provide support to free state settlers (including suggestions by which ministers and communities could raise necessary funds and/or provisions). Daniels believed that a large emigration of free state supporters was needed in the spring of 1857, and provided suggestions about what to take (including seed) and how to get to the Kansas Territory.

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James M. Winchell to Thaddeus Hyatt

Winchell, James M

James M. Winchell wrote from Burlington to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, regarding an emigrant train of 500 settlers heading south from Iowa City. The author intended to travel to speak with Governor Geary before he met up with the emigrants. Winchell also included in this letter a private insert pertaining to the unscrupulous dealings of a Kansas politician named Dr. Root.

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Richard Josiah Hinton to National Kansas Committee

Hinton, Richard J. (Richard Josiah), 1830-1901

R. J. Hinton wrote this letter from Lawrence to the members of the National Kansas Committee, offering his suggestions about how to sustain the struggling settlers of Kansas. He proposed the idea of bringing the manufacturing industry into the territory as a source of employment. He also mentioned that a flour mill would be greatly appreciated by Kansans.

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William Frederick Milton Arny to Thaddeus Hyatt

Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881

W. F. M. Arny, an agent of the National Kansas Committee, wrote this letter to Thaddeus Hyatt while traveling on the Missouri River. The main focus of this letter revolved around committee business and the state of affairs in Kansas. During this visit to Kansas, Arny had reorganized the Kansas Central Committee in order to increase its efficiency, and he included in this letter a revised list of its officers and members. He also wrote about his conversation with Governor Geary concerning the various volunteer companies created by free state men. The letter ends with a brief description of the suffering of the settlers, their meager diet, and their desperate need for more provisions.

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Kansas Relief Committee, newspaper article

Smith, I. N.

This article, published in the Haverhill, Massachusetts Tri-Weekly Publisher, lists the contributions collected by their local Kansas Relief Committee. A number of different churches in the area donated cash, and the committee also sent varied articles of clothing (listed in the article) to General S.C. Pomeroy of Atchison.

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Letter, John N. Gardner to Thaddeus Hyatt

Gardner, John N.

This letter, written from Buffalo by John N. Gardner, is addressed to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. Mr. Gardner relates the tale of Mrs. H.G. Hyzen of Waitsfield, Vermont, an ardent supporter of John Brown who claimed to have a clairvoyant vision of him in his prison cell. The entire letter is a passionate piece of correspondence, speaking frequently of liberty and the "Total Annihilation of that Scourge of Humanity, Human Slavery." The letter also mentions other abolitionists--Henry C. Wright and Mrs. Child--who wrote letters to John Brown. Though dated 1859, the letter must have been written in January 1860 after Brown's execution on December 2, 1859.

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Mrs. D.F. Robison to Horace Greeley

Robison, Mrs. D. F.

This brief letter, written by Mrs. D. F. Robison of Green Castle, Pennsylvania, was addressed to Horace Greeley, informing him of her small but unselfish contribution to Kansas relief. It is an excellent example of how even Northerners who were struggling financially took it upon themselves to aid the impoverished settlers of Kansas.

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James H. Greene to John Brown

Greene, James H.

James Greene, who had spent two years in Kansas himself, wrote from his Jefferson (hometown of Senator Benjamin F. Wade), Ashtabula Co., Ohio, newspaper office (Ashtabula Sentinel) to inform his friend that he would be publishing Brown's circular "soliciting aid for Kansas" and to ask what Brown's future plans were. The news from the territory was not good, according to Greene, and he wondered if there would be war or peace. Greene was still hopeful that the "free state men will eventually triumph," but most of his neighbors believed Kansas "will be a Slave State."

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