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Page 5 of 6, showing 10 records out of 60 total, starting on record 41, ending on 50

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Members of the Topeka, Kansas Bar Association

This black and white photograph panel shows members from the Topeka Bar Association, the Kansas Supreme Court and the District Judges of Kansas. In the center of the panel images have been inserted of U.S. Vice-President Charles Curtis, U.S. Circuit Judge Geo. T. McDermott, and U.S. District Judge Richard J. Hopkins. In the lower portion of the panel, on the left-hand side, are seven African American lawyers. One of them is Elisha Scott who prosecuted the civil rights case of Brown vs. Topeka Board of Education.

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Walter Augustus Huxman

This black and white photograph shows Walter Augustus Huxman, (1887-1972). Elected on November 3, 1936, as the twenty-seventh governor of Kansas, he served one term from 1937 to 1939. Failing to be reelected, Huxman was nominated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth District. He held this position until stepping down in 1962.

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Walter Augustus Huxman

This black and white photograph shows Walter Augustus Huxman, (1887-1972). He established his career as a public official by serving as Reno County's assistant attorney from 1915 to 1919, and later the city attorney of Hutchinson, Kansas from 1919 to 1921. Elected on November 3, 1936, as the twenty-seventh governor of Kansas, he served one term from 1937 to 1939. Failing to be reelected, Huxman was nominated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth District. He held this position until stepping down in 1962.

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James S. Emery

Bowman, photographer,

James Stanley Emery had a law practice in Lawrence, Kansas Territory. He was associated with the New England Emigrant Aid Company and worked as a journalist for the "New York Daily Times." He was involved in numerous free state activities both in Kansas Territory and in the East.

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Joseph Skubitz

Photo of Joseph Skubitz, 1906-2000, Pittsburg, Kansas, Republican who served in the U. S. House of Representatives, 1963-1978.

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William Weer, Brief for Applicant

Weer, William

William Weer served as legal counsel for the Wyandotte Reserve and presented this brief on behalf of William Lykins and Robert Robitaille apparently to the Commissioner of the Land Office at Lecompton, Kansas Territory. Lykins and Robitaille were attempting to receive a patent for land that was also claimed by the Lawrence Association, Gaius Jenkins, Charles Robinson, S. J. Livingston, George G. Mathews, and William Savage. The brief contained a short history of the Wyandot tribes removal west and various treaties involving land. The claim involved parts of the city of Lawrence. The brief cited various cases and laws upon which Mr. Weer based his arguments.

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William Alfred Peffer

Leonard, J. H.

William Alfred Peffer was the first Populist senator elected to U.S. Congress. He was born in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, on September 10, 1831. As a young man he traveled across the country, living in California, Indiana, Missouri, and Illinois. After the outbreak of Civil War, Peffer enlisted in the 83rd Illinois Infantry, entering as a private and working his way up to the rank of second lieutenant. He read law while still in the military, and after his discharge in 1865 he was admitted to the bar and began practicing law in Clarksville, Tennessee. Five years later he moved to Fredonia, Kansas, where he established another practice and edited the Fredonia Journal. Peffer served as a state senator from 1874 to 1876, and during his tenure he relocated to Coffeyville, Kansas, where he assumed editorial control of the Coffeyville Journal. Then, in 1881, he launched the Populist publication Kansas Farmer, one of his best-known contributions to this agrarian reform movement. Peffer was instrumental in the creation of the People?s (Populist) Party, serving as a Populist U.S. Senator from 1891 to 1897 and running again (unsuccessfully) for re-election in 1896. Two years later, he ran an unsuccessful campaign for Governor of Kansas, losing the election to Republican William Stanley. Peffer died in 1912 in Grenola, Kansas, at the age of 81.

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Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown

Webber, L. R.

A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from "Steamer Robert Campbell Jr. near Liberty Mo.," is addressed to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence, Kansas. Webber describes how his fellow troops have become more experienced soldiers "who fight for liberty and law." He discusses the march from Fort Riley to Fort Leavenworth and conditions on the boat that was taking them further south. He also mentiones William Brown's new law position with former Kansas Territory governor Wilson Shannon.

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William Eugene Stanley

This black and white photograph shows William Eugene Stanley, (1844-1910). Stanley, a native of Ohio, settled in Jefferson County, Kansas in 1870 to practice law. He entered public service, in 1871, by serving as the Jefferson County attorney, (1871-1872). A few years later he became the Sedgwick County attorney, (1874 to 1880). In 1880, he made a political bid for a seat in the Kansas House of Representatives and served one term as a Republican from the ninety-second district, (1881-1883). Stanley resumed his political career in 1898, when he was elected the fifteenth governor of Kansas. He was also re-elected in 1901 to a second term. Stanley left office on January 12, 1903 to return to private life in Wichita, Kansas and to practice law. On October 13, 1919, William Eugene Stanley died at the age of 66. He was buried at the Highland Cemetery in Wichita, Kansas.

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Temperance history correspondence

Correspondence sent and received by members of the Kansas State Temperance Union, primarily Rev. W. L. Dexter, secretary, Robert Norris, secretary, Julian K. Codding, lawyer, and William T. Jones, solicitor. Correspondents include Elizabeth P. Hutchinson, president of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Rev. Purley A. Baker, superintendent of the American Anti-Saloon League, Mary Evelyn Dobbs, Rev. Charles W. Whorrall, and William H. McCamish, assistant attorney general of Wyandotte County. Included in this correspondence are several signed petitions to members of the U.S. Senate from citizens in Arkansas City, Kirwin, and Abilene asking them to vote against the Hamilton Bill which they argue "would annul the solemn pledge of the Government to protect the Indians against the introduction and sale of intoxicants in the Indian territory." Some financial records are also included, such as a report from the finance committee for the previous year, ending February 15, 1905, and receipts and disbursements by month, signed by financial manager S. H. Pitcher. Although Kansas was the first state to adopt a constitutional amendment prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors in 1880, the law was largely unenforced.

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