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Page 5 of 18, showing 10 records out of 176 total, starting on record 41, ending on 50

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

S.T. Shore, testimony

This testimony, a portion of the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, was collected by the National Kansas Committee under the leadership of Thaddeus Hyatt. Although Captain Shore was a free state militia captain and was active during the border warfare of 1856, this account focuses on his personal life and his perceptions of the Kansas Territory rather than upon his political or military experiences. The testimony begins with general information about his family, claim, etc., and then proceeds to his personal opinion of the land and vegetation in Kansas.

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Samuel Newell Simpson to Hiram Hill

Simpson, Samuel Newell

Samuel Simpson wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill, reporting that free staters were "still live" in Lawrence, and that most border ruffians had retreated for the time being. Simpson updated Hill on the status of his properties and new construction in the town. Thaddeus Whitney, he said, was "absent from town", however, and Missourians had stolen some valuable building materials. Simpson added that he had helped many destitute families with the monetary aid Hill had sent.

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Samuel Lyle Adair to John Brown

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Samuel Adair wrote his brother-in-law John Brown from Osawatomie on October 2, 1857, to explain why he could not come see Brown in Iowa. Much of letter describes the general poor state of health in his locale, but he also comments on the political and especially the prospects for free state success in the upcoming election--Adair was not optimistic.

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Richard Mendenhall to Augustus Wattles

Mendenhall, Richard

Richard Mendenhall was a missionary at the Shawnee Friends Mission in the 1840s. He returned to Indiana for a time but moved back to Kansas Territory in the fall of 1855. He was in Kansas during the territorial era and wrote Wattles describing an attact on the Friends Mission on August 20, 1856 by proslavery forces. He indicated that they were told to leave or the mission would be burned. However, Mendenhall wrote that David Atchison and other proslavery supporters asked that the Friends be left out of the violence. Mendenhall also described an attempt to form a settlement by men from Georgia about 3 miles from Osawatomie. He wrote that they were friendly at first but they later committed depredations. In response, about 100 free state men ran them off, took $500 in clothing and provisions, and burned a fort they had built. Mendenhall believed that the Battle of Osawatomie was a response to this.

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Resolution of the Boston Preacher's Meeting

This resolution, "unanimously adopted" by the members of the Boston Preacher's Meeting, approved the establishment of Blue Mont Central College near Manhattan, Kansas Territory, by Reverend Joseph Denison, an "old friend" of the Boston Preachers. Denison had emigrated to K.T. following Isaac Goodnow, and was working with him to obtain support for the college.

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After twenty-one years: the success story of Dr. John R. Brinkley

Brinkley Hospitals

This booklet was published by the Brinkley Hospitals of Little Rock, Arkansas. Brinkley moved his hospital operations to Little Rock from Milford, Kansas, after his Kansas medical license was revoked. He changed the name of his radio station to XERA and it was located in Villa Acuna, Mexico, just across the border from Del Rio, Texas, where the Brinkley's had a home. The pamphlet is a revised version of an earlier Brinkley hospital publication titled Your Health (Kansas Memory item 210693). It includes illustrations to accompany the medical information.

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Edmund Jones to Hiram Hill

Jones, Edmund

Well before Hiram Hill of Williamsburgh, Massachusetts could have received Edmund Jones' previous letter from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, Jones received a bank draft from Hill. In this letter, Jones thanked him for the draft. He shortly expected two renters, Mrs. Herd and Mrs. Hall, to move into Hill's house in Lawrence. These renters wanted to build a house for their own boarders on the lot behind. A store and an office were going up on either side of Hill's new house. James mentioned controversy over city lots but did not identify the source of this "new movement." He encouraged Hill to visit Lawrence a second time in early fall.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday, founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, wrote from "Up the River," Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania, describing the difficult living conditions for him and the other men at the future site of Topeka, where they had been visited by Governor Andrew H. Reeder. Holliday assured his wife of his health and requested that she explain to Mr. Drew Lowry and Mr. McFarland in Pennsylvania why he had not written. He praised the beauty of the country and expressed his vision of its future, ending with a request that she write to him.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday, the founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. He told her of his planned trip up the Kansas River, his pleasure in the people of Kansas Territory, and a Thanksgiving dinner he attended. Unwilling to return to Pennsylvania, Holliday expressed desire that Mary come to Kansas Territory and described the construction of a friend's sod-covered "mansion," one such as Clarina I. H. Nichols, a lecturer and writer, inhabited.

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Charles Robinson to Amos Adams Lawrence

Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894

Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. Charles Robinson wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Amos A. Lawrence in Massachusetts. Robinson thanked Lawrence for his unfailing support of the enterprise of the Territory and claimed his devotion to work done in his interest. He discussed Lawrence's development, having secured the offices of three free state newspapers, but expressed anxiety about the upcoming territorial election. However, Robinson vowed that his men would not resort to fraudulent voting to win the majority over proslavery supporters.

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