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Page 5 of 43, showing 10 records out of 428 total, starting on record 41, ending on 50

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Amelia Earhart

MacDonald, W. H.

A photograph of Amelia Earhart and George P. Putnum taken in Rye, New York. Putnam helped coordinate Earhart's 1928 trans-Atlantic flight and acted as her promoter following the flight. Earhart and Putnam married in 1931. Earhart disappeared in 1937 during her attempt to fly around the world.

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Actor Karl Malden and Roy Menninger, M.D.

Actor Karl Malden was a member of the Board of Directors of the Menninger Foundation. He is shown here with Roy Menninger, M.D., in 1993 at a gathering in Los Angeles, California.

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Arthur Capper, with Senators Norbeck, McNary, Ransdell, and Heflin calling on President Herbert Hoover at the White House

Henry Miller News Picture Service

Arthur Capper, United States senator from Kansas, with Senators Norbeck, McNary, Ransdell, and Heflin, members of the Senate Committee on Agriculture, calling on President Herbert Hoover at the White House, Washington, D.C., April 11, 1929.

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Joseph Harrington Trego to an unidentified recipient [probably his wife, Alice Trego]

Trego, Joseph H. (Joseph Harrington), 1823-1905

Trego was in St. Louis, Missouri awaiting a boat trip to Kansas City. He describes his trip to that point as well as the weather. Trego was a doctor and he wrote about trying to locate his medicine chest for the second part of the journey. He also described his activities as he waited. It is not clear whether he had been to Kansas Territory before but he knew he was going to Sugar Mound in Linn County, Kansas Territory.

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Vice President Charles Curtis

Acme News Pictures, Inc

This black and white photograph shows Vice President Charles Curtis throwing out the first baseball to start the game between Democratic and Republican members of the House of Representatives, Washington D. C. Curtis, the 31st Vice President of the United States (1929-1933), was the first Native American to be elected to that office.

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Samuel L. Adair to Joseph Gordon

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

This is a copy of a letter written by Samuel Adair from Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. Adair thanks Reverend Gordon for $104 raised in Yellow Springs, Ohio, that was sent to James Garrison for "the benefit of sufferers in the cause of freedom in the Osawatomie vicinity." He describes the difficulties of distributing relief aid to everyone's satisfaction and mentions the Kansas Central Committee. He also writes of his concerns about how slavery and its demise will impact the nation using phrases such as "conflict of arms" and "fearful doom."

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Rachel Garrison to Samuel Adair

Garrison, Rachel A.

Rachel Garrison wrote to her cousin, Samuel Adair, that she had a little daughter two months old, which meant she was pregnant when her husband, David Garrison, was killed in the Battle of Osawatomie in August, 1856, and when she returned to Yellow Springs, Ohio. She also mentioned her other daughter, Jania. She hoped Adair could hold on to the claim the Garrisons pre-empted until it could be entered at the land office. She also listed items she would like Adair to sell for her. The same letter also contained correspondence from James Garrison.

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William Allen White in Colorado

This is a photograph showing William Allen White in a rocking chair on the porch of his cabin in Colorado. White was the long time editor of the Emporia Gazette.

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I. T. Irwin to Lewis Allen Alderson

Letter from I. T. Irwin to Lewis Allen Alderson. Alderson later moved to Atchison, Kansas, in 1858 and was a prominent Baptist minister. He died in Atchison in 1881.

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E. S. Whitney to Hiram Hill

Whitney, E.S.

E. S. Whitney wrote from Sumner, Kansas Territory, to her uncle, Hiram Hill. Whitney apologized for the long delay in communicating with him, and explained that her husband, Thaddeus Whitney, had been very busy lately and was doing his best to complete Hill's home. She also described her experience watching the border ruffians invade Lawrence, and her friends' and neighbors' reactions to the situation. Despite the violence and uncertainty, she was "not sorry yet" that she had come to Kansas, and told Hill that her husband would write him shortly to discuss business matters.

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